Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Cell Biol. 2011 Apr;21(4):212-8. doi: 10.1016/j.tcb.2010.12.004. Epub 2011 Jan 13.

Regeneration in plants and animals: dedifferentiation, transdifferentiation, or just differentiation?

Author information

1
Division of Biology 156-29, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA.

Abstract

The textbooks and literature of plant biology indicate that plant cells are totipotent, and that regeneration occurs via dedifferentiation, by which the cell and its descendents recapitulate earlier stages of development. However, recent work on the generation of callus, a presumed undifferentiated or dedifferentiated and disorganized cellular mass, indicates that the cells of callus are neither, and that callus forms predominantly from a pre-existing population of stem cells. Recent work in animal regeneration, for example in salamander limbs, also indicates that previous assumptions about the extent of dedifferentiation and pluripotency in animals are in need of critical reassessment. We review here some of these data, compare plant and animal regeneration, and argue that the importance of dedifferentiation and plasticity in regenerating systems is due for reevaluation.

PMID:
21236679
DOI:
10.1016/j.tcb.2010.12.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center