Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuron. 2019 May 8;102(3):683-693.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2019.02.014. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Hippocampal Contributions to Model-Based Planning and Spatial Memory.

Author information

1
Center for Neural Science, New York University School of Arts and Science, New York, NY 10003, USA. Electronic address: omv208@nyu.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, New York University School of Arts and Science, New York, NY 10003, USA; Department of Neurology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.
3
Division of Psychology & Language Sciences, Department of Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology, University College London, London WC1H 0AP, UK.
4
Department of Physiology, Neuroscience, and Behavioral Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, St. George, Grenada, West Indies.
5
Department of Neurology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA; Department of Neurosurgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA; Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.
6
Department of Psychology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA; Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute and Kavli Institute for Brain Science, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA.
7
Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London WC1N 3AZ, UK; Institute of Neurology, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK.
8
Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA; Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA. Electronic address: ndaw@princeton.edu.

Abstract

Little is known about the neural mechanisms that allow humans and animals to plan actions using knowledge of task contingencies. Emerging theories hypothesize that it involves the same hippocampal mechanisms that support self-localization and memory for locations. Yet limited direct evidence supports the link between planning and the hippocampal place map. We addressed this by investigating model-based planning and place memory in healthy controls and epilepsy patients treated using unilateral anterior temporal lobectomy with hippocampal resection. Both functions were impaired in the patient group. Specifically, the planning impairment was related to right hippocampal lesion size, controlling for overall lesion size. Furthermore, although planning and boundary-driven place memory covaried in the control group, this relationship was attenuated in patients, consistent with both functions relying on the same structure in the healthy brain. These findings clarify both the neural mechanism of model-based planning and the scope of hippocampal contributions to behavior.

KEYWORDS:

anterior temporal lobe; decision-making; hippocampus; human; lesion; memory; model-based; planning; reinforcement learning; spatial

PMID:
30871859
PMCID:
PMC6508991
[Available on 2020-05-08]
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2019.02.014

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center