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J Nutr Educ Behav. 2019 Feb;51(2):129-137.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2018.11.011.

Nutrition Counseling for Hypertension Within a Grocery Store: An Example of the Patient-Centered Medical Neighborhood Model.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH. Electronic address: rpw39@case.edu.
2
Department of Family Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.
3
Viocare, Inc., Princeton, NJ.
4
College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.
5
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.
6
Department of Family Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effectiveness of nutrition counseling for patients with hypertension, provided in a grocery store setting.

DESIGN:

Single-arm pretest-posttest design implementing a 12-week dietary intervention.

SETTING:

Grocery store.

PARTICIPANTS:

Thirty adults with hypertension recruited from a primary care practice.

INTERVENTION:

Registered dietitian nutritionists provided counseling based on the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Dietary intake patterns and Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) scores measured via food-frequency questionnaire. Change in systolic blood pressure (SBP) was a secondary outcome.

ANALYSIS:

Paired t tests were used to test for differences between HEI-2010 scores, intake of key food pattern components, and SBP at baseline compared with follow-up. Statistical significance was established at P ≤ .05.

RESULTS:

Eight HEI-2010 component scores increased significantly from baseline to follow-up (a change toward a more desirable eating pattern): total fruit, whole fruit, greens and beans, whole grains, fatty acids, refined grains, and empty calories. Sodium (P < .001), saturated fat (P < .001), discretionary solid fat (P < .001), added sugars (P = .01), and total fat (P < .001) all decreased significantly. The change in SBP was not significant.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Grocery store-based counseling for patients with hypertension may be an effective strategy to provide lifestyle counseling that is not typically available within primary care.

KEYWORDS:

DASH diet; hypertension; medical neighborhood; nutrition counseling

PMID:
30738561
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneb.2018.11.011

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