Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Alzheimers Dement. 2019 Apr;15(4):525-533. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2018.11.004. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Longitudinal study of hearing loss and subjective cognitive function decline in men.

Author information

1
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: SCurhan@bwh.harvard.edu.
2
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

We examined the relation between self-reported hearing loss, hearing aid use, and risk of subjective cognitive function (SCF) decline.

METHODS:

We conducted an 8-year (2008-2016) longitudinal study of 10,107 men aged ≥62 years who reported their hearing status in 2006 and had no subjective cognitive concerns in 2008. Change in SCF scores was assessed by a 6-item questionnaire, and subjective decline was defined as new report of at least one SCF concern during follow-up.

RESULTS:

Hearing loss was associated with higher risk of SCF decline. Compared with no hearing loss, the multivariable-adjusted relative risk (95% CI) of incident SCF decline was 1.30 (1.18, 1.42), 1.42 (1.26, 1.61), and 1.54 (1.22, 1.96) among men with mild, moderate, and severe hearing loss (no hearing aids), respectively (P-trend < .001). Among men with severe hearing loss who used hearing aids, the multivariable-adjusted relative risk (95% CI) was 1.37 (1.18, 1.60).

DISCUSSION:

Hearing loss was associated with substantially higher risk of subsequent subjective cognitive decline in men.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Cognition; Hearing aids; Hearing loss; Longitudinal study; Subjective cognitive function

PMID:
30709794
PMCID:
PMC6461517
[Available on 2020-04-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2018.11.004

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center