Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Int. 2019 Aug;129:145-153. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2019.05.004. Epub 2019 May 22.

Long-term exposure to atmospheric metals assessed by mosses and mortality in France.

Author information

1
INSERM, U1168, VIMA: Aging and Chronic Diseases, Epidemiological and Public Health Approaches, F-94807 Villejuif, France; University of Versailles St-Quentin-en-Yvelines, UMR-S 1168, F-78180 Montigny-le-Bretonneux, France; INSERM, UMS 011, F-94807 Villejuif, France.
2
CRCHUM (Centre de recherche du CHUM) and Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Université de Montréal, QC, Canada.
3
UMS 2006 PatriNat, National Museum of Natural History, 12 rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris, France.
4
INSERM, UMS 011, F-94807 Villejuif, France.
5
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
6
INSERM, UMS 011, F-94807 Villejuif, France; Université Paris Descartes, 12, rue de l'école de médecine, F-75006 Paris, France.
7
INSERM, U1168, VIMA: Aging and Chronic Diseases, Epidemiological and Public Health Approaches, F-94807 Villejuif, France; University of Versailles St-Quentin-en-Yvelines, UMR-S 1168, F-78180 Montigny-le-Bretonneux, France; ISGlobal-Institut de Salut Global de Barcelona, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; University Pompeu Fabra (UPF), 08003 Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), 08003 Barcelona, Spain; Univ Rennes, Inserm, EHESP, Irset (Institut de recherche en santé, environnement et travail) - UMR_S 1085, F-35000 Rennes, France. Electronic address: benedicte.jacquemin@inserm.fr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Long-term exposure to air pollution affects health, but little is known about exposure to atmospheric metals. Estimating exposure to atmospheric metals across large spatial areas remains challenging. Metal concentrations in mosses could constitute a useful proxy. Here, we linked moss biomonitoring and epidemiological data to investigate the associations between long-term exposure to metals and mortality.

METHODS:

We modelled and mapped 13 atmospheric metals from a 20-year national moss biomonitoring program to derive exposure estimates across France. In the population-based Gazel cohort, we included 11,382 participants from low to intermediate population density areas and assigned modelled metals to their residential addresses. We distinguished between airborne metals that are primarily of natural origin and those primarily of anthropogenic origin. Associations were estimated between exposure to metals and mortality (natural-cause, cardiovascular and respiratory), using Cox models, with confounder adjustment at individual level.

FINDINGS:

Between 1996 and 2017, there were 1313 deaths in the cohort (including 181 cardiovascular and 33 respiratory). Exposure to the anthropogenic metals was associated with an increased risk of natural-cause mortality (hazard ratio of 1.16 [1.08-1.24] per interquartile range of exposure), while metals from natural sources were not.

INTERPRETATION:

Some atmospheric anthropogenic metals may be associated with excess mortality - even in areas with relatively low levels of exposure to air pollution. Consistent with the previous literature, our findings support the use of moss biomonitoring as a tool to assess health effects of air pollution exposure at individual level.

PMID:
31128435
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2019.05.004
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center