Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Biol. 2018 Oct 8;28(19):3114-3122.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2018.07.043. Epub 2018 Sep 20.

Inactivation of Medial Frontal Cortex Changes Risk Preference.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2685, USA; Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2685, USA.
2
Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2685, USA; Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2685, USA. Electronic address: veit@jhu.edu.

Abstract

Humans and other animals need to make decisions under varying degrees of uncertainty. These decisions are strongly influenced by an individual's risk preference; however, the neuronal circuitry by which risk preference shapes choice is still unclear [1]. Supplementary eye field (SEF), an oculomotor area within primate medial frontal cortex, is thought to be an essential part of the neuronal circuit underlying oculomotor decision making, including decisions under risk [2-5]. Consistent with this view, risk-related action value and monitoring signals have been observed in SEF [6-8]. However, such activity has also been observed in other frontal areas, including orbitofrontal [9-11], cingulate [12-14], and dorsal-lateral frontal cortex [15]. It is thus unknown whether the activity in SEF causally contributes to risky decisions, or whether it is merely a reflection of neural processes in other cortical regions. Here, we tested a causal role of SEF in risky oculomotor choices. We found that SEF inactivation strongly reduced the frequency of risky choices. This reduction was largely due to a reduced attraction to reward uncertainty and high reward gain, but not due to changes in the subjective estimation of reward probability or average expected reward. Moreover, SEF inactivation also led to increased sensitivity to differences between expected and actual reward during free choice. Nevertheless, it did not affect adjustments of decisions based on reward history.

KEYWORDS:

SEF; decision; monkey; occulomotor; prefrontal; primate; saccade; supplementary eye field; value

PMID:
30245108
PMCID:
PMC6177298
[Available on 2019-10-08]
DOI:
10.1016/j.cub.2018.07.043
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center