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Can J Cardiol. 2018 May;34(5):670-675. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2018.01.008.

Applicability of the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) to the Canadian Population.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: aacleung@ucalgary.ca.
2
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
3
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Center for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
5
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) showed significant reductions in major cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality with a systolic blood pressure (BP) goal of < 120 mm Hg compared with < 140 mm Hg. We sought to determine the proportion of Canadian adults who meet SPRINT eligibility criteria.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional study using cycles 1-3 of the nationally representative Canadian Health Measures Survey to estimate the prevalence and characteristics of Canadian adults between the ages of 20 and 79 who meet SPRINT eligibility criteria: age ≥ 50 years, elevated systolic BP of 130-180 mm Hg, and increased cardiovascular risk (with chronic kidney disease, Framingham Risk Score ≥ 15% in 10 years, and/or cardiovascular disease) but without diabetes, stroke, or end-stage renal disease.

RESULTS:

An estimated 1.3 million (5.2%) Canadian adults met SPRINT eligibility criteria; 14.3% (95% confidence interval, 10.6%-17.9%), or 182,600 people, were not previously considered to have hypertension or need for antihypertensive therapy. Of adults aged 50-79 years treated for hypertension, 18.7% (95% confidence interval, 15.5%-21.8%), or 754,400 individuals, would potentially benefit from treatment intensification.

CONCLUSIONS:

If fully implemented, intensive systolic BP lowering to < 120 mm Hg in SPRINT-eligible high-risk individuals would substantially increase the proportion of Canadian adults receiving BP treatment initiation or intensification.

PMID:
29731026
DOI:
10.1016/j.cjca.2018.01.008

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