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Brain Stimul. 2018 Jul - Aug;11(4):860-862. doi: 10.1016/j.brs.2018.04.002. Epub 2018 Apr 5.

Involuntary and voluntary electroconvulsive therapy: A case-control study.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, St. Patrick's University Hospital, James's St., Dublin 8, Ireland.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, St. Patrick's University Hospital, James's St., Dublin 8, Ireland. Electronic address: d.mcloughlin@tcd.ie.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It is not known whether results of clinical research in ECT can be used to guide treatment decisions for those having involuntary ECT, who are not represented in trial populations.

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed to compare courses of involuntary ECT with matched voluntary ECT courses in terms of clinical and demographic factors, treatment requirements, and outcomes.

METHOD:

We performed a retrospective case-control study examining a five-year sample of involuntary ECT courses and an age-, gender- and time-matched voluntary ECT control sample.

RESULTS:

We examined 48 involuntary and 96 control voluntary ECT courses. While groups differed at baseline in terms of diagnosis, illness severity and illness characteristics, there were no differences in treatment outcomes after ECT or six-month readmission rates.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings suggest that research on capacitous ECT patients is applicable to those having involuntary ECT.

KEYWORDS:

Depression; Electroconvulsive therapy; Involuntary; Practice

PMID:
29643022
DOI:
10.1016/j.brs.2018.04.002

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