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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 Jan;93(1):62-71. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2011.08.006. Epub 2011 Oct 13.

Positive associations between physical and cognitive performance measures in fibromyalgia.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, CA 92834-6846, USA. bcherry@fullerton.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the associations between perceived physical function (self-report) and physical and cognitive performance (objective assessments) in persons with fibromyalgia (FM).

DESIGN:

Correlational study.

SETTING:

Exercise testing laboratory in Southern California.

PARTICIPANTS:

Community-residing ambulatory adults meeting the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria for FM (N=68; mean age, 59.5y).

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Composite Physical Function scale, Senior Fitness Test (3 items), Fullerton Advanced Balance scale, 30-foot walk, Trail Making Test parts A and B, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, a composite score of these 3 cognitive measures, attention/executive function composite, processing speed composite, problem solving, inhibition, and episodic memory composite.

RESULTS:

Hierarchical regression analyses showed that after controlling for age and FM symptoms, better physical performance (based on assessments, not self-report) was associated with higher cognitive function in attention/executive function, processing speed, problem solving, and inhibition.

CONCLUSIONS:

Researchers should continue to investigate the relationship between physical and cognitive function in both clinical and nonclinical populations, as well as explore changes across time. Because physical activity has been associated with neural improvements, further research may identify whether particular mechanisms, such as neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, or changes in inflammatory marker levels, are involved.

PMID:
21996532
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2011.08.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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