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Appl Ergon. 2018 Jul;70:156-166. doi: 10.1016/j.apergo.2018.02.022. Epub 2018 Mar 20.

Does wearable device bring distraction closer to drivers? Comparing smartphones and Google Glass.

Author information

1
School of Education, Laboratory of Cognition and Mental Health, Chongqing University of Arts and Science, Yongchuan, Chongqing, China; Department of Psychology, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 67260, USA. Electronic address: jibo.he@wichita.edu.
2
School of Psychological Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA.
3
School of Education, Laboratory of Cognition and Mental Health, Chongqing University of Arts and Science, Yongchuan, Chongqing, China.
4
Department of Computer Science, University of Texas at San Antonio, TX 78249, USA.
5
Department of Psychology, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 67260, USA.
6
USee Eye-Tracking Technology Company, Beijing, 100871, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Head-up and wearable displays, such as Google Glass™, are sometimes marketed as safe in-vehicle alternatives to phone-based displays, as they allow drivers to receive messages without eye-off-the-road glances. However, head-up displays can still compromise driver performance (e.g., He et al., 2015b), as the distracting effect of interacting with any device will depend on the user's multitasking strategies. The present experiment examined drivers' interaction with a head-down smartphone display and a wearable head-up display.

METHOD:

Participants performed a simulated driving task while receiving and responding to text messages via smartphone or the head-mounted display (HMD) on the Google Glass™. Incoming messages were signaled by an auditory alert, and responses were made vocally.

RESULTS:

When using Google Glass, participants' responses were quicker than that of smartphone, and the time to engage in a task did not vary according to lane-keeping difficulty. Results suggest that a willingness to engage more readily in distracting tasks may offset the potential safety benefits of wearable devices.

KEYWORDS:

Driver distraction; Google Glass; Head-mounted display; Multitasking strategy; Texting while driving; Wearable devices

PMID:
29866306
DOI:
10.1016/j.apergo.2018.02.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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