Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Prev Med. 2019 Feb;56(2):e35-e43. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2018.09.015. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Exposure to Child-Directed TV Advertising and Preschoolers' Intake of Advertised Cereals.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Department of Epidemiology, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Department of Pediatrics, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire. Electronic address: jennifer.a.emond@dartmouth.edu.
2
Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Department of Pediatrics, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire.
3
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Greylock McKinnon Associates, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
4
Department of Epidemiology, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Department of Pediatrics, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire.
6
Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire.
7
Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut.
8
Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire.
9
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Harvard School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Child-directed TV advertising is believed to influence children's diets, yet prospective studies in naturalistic settings are absent. This study examined if child-directed TV advertisement exposure for ten brands of high-sugar breakfast cereals was associated with children's intake of those brands prospectively.

METHODS:

Observational study of 624 preschool-age children and their parents conducted in New Hampshire, 2014-2015. Over 1 year, parents completed a baseline and six online follow-up surveys, one every 8 weeks. Children's exposure to high-sugar breakfast cereal TV advertisements was based on the network-specific TV programs children watched in the 7 days prior to each follow-up assessment, and parents reported children's intake of each advertised high-sugar breakfast cereal brand during that same 7-day period. Data were analyzed in 2017-2018.

RESULTS:

In the fully adjusted Poisson regression model accounting for repeated measures and brand-specific effects, children with high-sugar breakfast cereal advertisement exposure in the past 7 days (i.e., recent exposure; RR=1.34, 95% CI=1.04, 1.72), at any assessment in the past (RR=1.23, 95% CI=1.06, 1.42), or recent and past exposure (RR=1.37, 95% CI=1.15, 1.63) combined had an increased risk of brand-specific high-sugar breakfast cereal intake. Absolute risk difference of children's high-sugar breakfast cereal intake because of high-sugar breakfast cereal TV advertisement exposure varied by brand.

CONCLUSIONS:

This naturalistic study demonstrates that child-directed high-sugar breakfast cereal TV advertising was prospectively associated with brand-specific high-sugar breakfast cereal intake among preschoolers. Findings indicate that child-directed advertising influences begin earlier and last longer than previously demonstrated, highlighting limitations of current industry guidelines regarding the marketing of high-sugar foods to children under age 6 years.

PMID:
30573338
PMCID:
PMC6340774
[Available on 2020-02-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2018.09.015

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center