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Patient Educ Couns. 2018 Mar;101(3):546-550. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2017.08.021. Epub 2017 Sep 9.

Colorectal cancer screening: Associations between information provision, attitudes and intended participation.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Population Health Services, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; Veterans Affairs Center Salt Lake City Salt Lake City VA Center for Informatics Decision Enhancement and Surveillance (IDEAS), Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
3
Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Center for Clinical Management Research, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; Cancer Surveillance & Outcomes Research Team (CanSORT), University of Michigan, North Campus Research Complex, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
4
Discipline of General Practice, Sydney Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia.
5
Screening & Test Evaluation Program (STEP), The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; Centre for Medical Psychology & Evidence-based Decision-making (CeMPED), The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
6
Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: i.korfage@erasmusmc.nl.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Properly informing target audiences is crucial in population-based screening programs. We aimed to evaluate the impact of information about CRC screening on attitudes and intended participation in a screening-naive population.

METHODS:

614 persons (aged 55-75 years) received a survey. Information on CRC and screening was provided piece by piece, and per piece its impact on attitudes and intended participation was assessed. All persons received the same information content, but the sequence of information differed per condition: information on the high mortality rate of colorectal cancer was presented in the first or the second piece. Educational levels, the extent people considered future consequences, and value concordance between attitudes and intentions were assessed.

RESULTS:

436 persons (response 71%) completed the survey. Overall most respondents reported positive attitudes towards CRC screening (78%) and intentions to participate in CRC screening (83%), independent of sequence of information provision. Intentions about participation were value concordant in the majority (88%). Results were similar in low educated groups.

CONCLUSION:

Providing balanced information about CRC screening (also addressing negative effects) did not impede value concordance and high rates of intended participation.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

High rates of screening intentions are possible without omitting threatening health information in communication materials.

KEYWORDS:

Colorectal cancer; Communication; Informed choice; Participation; Screening; Value concordance

PMID:
28899711
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2017.08.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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