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J Clin Psychol Med Settings. 2019 Apr 2. doi: 10.1007/s10880-019-09614-6. [Epub ahead of print]

Child-Parent Psychotherapy with Infants Hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Author information

1
University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, University of Southern California, 4650 Sunset Blvd, MS#53, Los Angeles, CA, 90027, USA. plakatos@chla.usc.edu.
2
University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, University of Southern California, 4650 Sunset Blvd, MS#53, Los Angeles, CA, 90027, USA.

Abstract

Hospitalization in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a stressful and potentially traumatic experience for infants as well as their parents. The highly specialized medical environment can threaten the development of a nurturing and secure caregiving relationship and potentially derail an infant's development. Well-timed, dose-specific interventions that include an infant mental health approach can buffer the impact of medical traumatic stress and separations and support the attachment relationship. Many psychological interventions in the NICU setting focus on either the parent's mental health or the infant's neurodevelopmental functioning. An alternative approach is to implement a relationship-based, dyadic intervention model that focuses on the developing parent-infant relationship. Child-parent psychotherapy (CPP) is an evidence-based trauma-informed dyadic intervention model for infants and young children who have experienced a traumatic event. This article describes the adaptation of CPP for the NICU environment.

KEYWORDS:

Child–parent psychotherapy; Infant mental health; Neonatal intensive care unit; Pediatric medical traumatic stress; Pediatric psychology; Trauma-informed care

PMID:
30941622
DOI:
10.1007/s10880-019-09614-6

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