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Dig Dis Sci. 2019 Feb 15. doi: 10.1007/s10620-019-05523-8. [Epub ahead of print]

Impact of Peppermint Therapy on Dysphagia and Non-cardiac Chest Pain: A Pilot Study.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical University of South Carolina, 30 Courtenay Drive, Suite 249, MSC 702, Charleston, SC, 29425-2900, USA. khalaf@musc.edu.
2
Alexandria Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria, Egypt. khalaf@musc.edu.
3
Department of Medicine, West Virginia University Hospital, Morgantown, WV, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical University of South Carolina, 30 Courtenay Drive, Suite 249, MSC 702, Charleston, SC, 29425-2900, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Due to its smooth muscle relaxing properties, peppermint oil (PO) may relieve dysphagia and chest pain due to esophageal motility disorders.

AIM:

To explore the impact of PO on dysphagia and/or chest pain in patients referred for motility testing.

METHODS:

Patients initiated on PO for dysphagia and/or chest pain from 2013 to 2016 were identified. We excluded patients with obstructing esophageal lesions, patients lost to follow-up, and those with preexisting cardiac conditions. Concentrated PO was given as commercially available dissolvable peppermint tablets; two tablets before meals were prescribed to patients with dysphagia and on an as-needed basis for patients with chest pain. Patient-reported symptom response was assessed using a modified five-point Likert scale.

RESULTS:

Thirty-eight patients were included. Twenty-four patients (63%) reported improvement; 12 were much better and 12 were slightly better. Fourteen experienced no change and none reported feeling worse. Based on pre-treatment HRM, patients with distal esophageal spasm (DES) (n = 10) and esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (EGJOO) (n = 8) appeared to demonstrate the best subjective improvement (83% and 100%, respectively) (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

PO appears to provide symptomatic relief in some patients with dysphagia and CP. Presence of a well-defined manometric disorder, particularly DES or EGJOO, appeared to predict response.

KEYWORDS:

Chest pain; Dysphagia; Esophagus; Motility

PMID:
30771044
DOI:
10.1007/s10620-019-05523-8

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