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Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2017 Aug 19;19(10):70. doi: 10.1007/s11920-017-0824-4.

Understanding Peripartum Depression Through Neuroimaging: a Review of Structural and Functional Connectivity and Molecular Imaging Research.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Zucker Hillside Hospital, Northwell Health, Glen Oaks, New York City, NY, 11004, USA.
2
Women's Behavioral Health, Zucker Hillside Hospital, Northwell Health, 75-59 263rd Street, Glen Oaks, New York City, NY, 11004, USA. kdeligian1@northwell.edu.
3
Departments of Psychiatry and Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Northwell Health, Hempstead, NY, 11549, USA. kdeligian1@northwell.edu.
4
Center for Psychiatric Neuroscience, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, 11030, USA. kdeligian1@northwell.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Imaging research has sought to uncover brain structure, function, and metabolism in women with postpartum depression (PPD) as little is known about its underlying pathophysiology. This review discusses the imaging modalities used to date to evaluate postpartum depression and highlights recent findings.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Altered functional connectivity and activity changes in brain areas implicated in executive functioning and emotion and reward processing have been identified in PPD. Metabolism changes involving monoamine oxidase A, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, serotonin, and dopamine have additionally been reported. To date, no studies have evaluated gray matter morphometry, voxel-based morphometry, surface area, cortical thickness, or white matter tract integrity in PPD. Recent imaging studies report changes in functional connectivity and metabolism in women with PPD vs. healthy comparison women. Future research is needed to extend these findings as they have important implications for the prevention and treatment of postpartum mood disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Depression; Magnetic resonance imaging; Neuroimaging; Perinatal; Postpartum

PMID:
28823105
PMCID:
PMC5617352
DOI:
10.1007/s11920-017-0824-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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