Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found using an alternative search:

Cell Rep. 2018 Feb 6;22(6):1531-1544. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2018.01.041.

β-aminoisobutyric Acid, l-BAIBA, Is a Muscle-Derived Osteocyte Survival Factor.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. Electronic address: kitasey@iu.edu.
2
Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA; Department of Oral & Craniofacial Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA.
3
Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA.
4
Department of Osteology and Biomechanics, University of Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
5
Kansas City University of Medicine and Bioscience, Kansas City, MO 64106, USA.
6
Bone-Muscle Collaborative Science, College of Nursing & Health Innovation, University of Texas-Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019, USA.
7
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. Electronic address: lbonewal@iu.edu.

Abstract

Exercise has beneficial effects on metabolism and on tissues. The exercise-induced muscle factor β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) plays a critical role in the browning of white fat and in insulin resistance. Here we show another function for BAIBA, that of a bone-protective factor that prevents osteocyte cell death induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). l-BAIBA was as or more protective than estrogen or N-acetyl cysteine, signaling through the Mas-Related G Protein-Coupled Receptor Type D (MRGPRD) to prevent the breakdown of mitochondria due to ROS. BAIBA supplied in drinking water prevented bone loss and loss of muscle function in the murine hindlimb unloading model, a model of osteocyte apoptosis. The protective effect of BAIBA was lost with age, not due to loss of the muscle capacity to produce BAIBA but likely to reduced Mrgprd expression with aging. This has implications for understanding the attenuated effect of exercise on bone with aging.

KEYWORDS:

BAIBA; Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor type D; aging; bone-muscle crosstalk; hindlimb unloading; mitochondria; osteocyte; reactive oxygen species; viability; β-aminoisobutyric acid

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center