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Nutrients. 2019 Jun 5;11(6). pii: E1274. doi: 10.3390/nu11061274.

Coffee Intake and Obesity: A Meta-Analysis.

Author information

1
Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. ariel.lee.21@dartmouth.edu.
2
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Dongguk University, Goyang 10325, Korea. dladnqls1234@naver.com.
3
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Dongguk University, Goyang 10325, Korea. sy98727@naver.com.
4
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Dongguk University, Goyang 10325, Korea. kyk3079@naver.com.
5
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Dongguk University, Goyang 10325, Korea. eugenecheon9@naver.com.
6
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Dongguk University, Goyang 10325, Korea. asv0321@naver.com.
7
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Dongguk University, Goyang 10325, Korea. olivialol@naver.com.
8
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02138, USA. dhlee@mail.harvard.edu.
9
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Dongguk University, Goyang 10325, Korea. sskang@dongguk.edu.
10
College of Health Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Korea. hannahoh@korea.ac.kr.
11
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Dongguk University, Goyang 10325, Korea. nak212@mail.harvard.edu.
12
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02138, USA. nak212@mail.harvard.edu.
13
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02138, USA. CHESIEH@hsph.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Many studies have explored the relationship between coffee-one of the most commonly consumed beverages today-and obesity. Despite inconsistent results, the relationship has not been systematically summarized. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis by compiling data from 12 epidemiologic studies identified from PubMed and Embase through February 2019. The included studies assessed obesity by body mass index (BMI, a measure of overall adiposity) or waist circumference (WC, a measure of central adiposity); analyzed the measure as a continuous outcome or binary outcome. Using random effects model, weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were obtained for continuous outcomes; summary relative risk (RR) and 95% CI for the highest vs. lowest categories of coffee intake were estimated for binary outcome. For BMI, WMD was -0.08 (95% CI -0.14, -0.02); RR was 1.49 (95% CI 0.97, 2.29). For WC, WMD was -0.27 (95% CI -0.51, -0.02) and RR was 1.07 (95% CI 0.84, 1.36). In subgroup analysis by sex, evidence for an inverse association was more evident in men, specifically for continuous outcome, with WMD -0.05 (95% CI -0.09, -0.02) for BMI and -0.21 (95% CI -0.35, -0.08) for WC. Our meta-analysis suggests that higher coffee intake might be modestly associated with reduced adiposity, particularly in men.

KEYWORDS:

adiposity; body mass index; coffee intake; meta-analysis; obesity; waist circumference

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