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J Funct Biomater. 2019 Jun 27;10(3). pii: E27. doi: 10.3390/jfb10030027.

Repair of Orbital Post-Traumatic Wall Defects by Custom-Made TiNi Mesh Endografts.

Author information

1
Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk National Research Medical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634028, Russia.
2
Research Institute of Medical Materials, Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634045, Russia. tc77@rec.tsu.ru.
3
Kang and Park Medical Co., R&D Center, Ochang 28119, Korea. tc77@rec.tsu.ru.
4
Research Institute of Medical Materials, Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634045, Russia.
5
SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University, College of Medicine, Seoul 07061, Korea.
6
Kang and Park Medical Co., R&D Center, Ochang 28119, Korea.
7
Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Technology, Brandenburg University of Technology, 03044 Cottbus, Germany.

Abstract

Repairs of orbital post-traumatic and extensive malignant defects remain a major surgical challenge, in view of follow-up outcomes. Incorrect surgical management of injured facial structures results in cosmetic, ophthalmic, and social aftereffects. A custom-made knitted TiNi-based mesh (KTNM) endograft was employed to overcome post-surgical complications and post-resected lesions of the orbital area. Preoperative high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging and CAD modelling were used to design the customized KTNM in each case. Twenty-five patients underwent surgery utilizing the suggested technique, from 2014 to 2019. In all documented cases, resolution of the ophthalmic malfunction was noted in the early period. Follow-up observation evidenced no relapsed enophthalmos, hypoglobus, or diplopia as late complications. The findings emanating from our clinical observations allow us to claim that the KTNM indicated a high level of biocompatibility. It is simply modified intraoperatively to attach any desired shape/size for implantation and can also be screw-fixed, providing a good supporting ability. The KTNM precisely renders orbitozygomatic outlines and orbital floor, thus recovering the anatomical structure, and is regarded as an attractive alternative to Ti-based meshes and plates. Additionally, we report one of the studied cases, where good functional and cosmetic outcomes have been achieved.

KEYWORDS:

TiNi mesh; diplopia; enophthalmos; orbital defect repair

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