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Items: 9

1.

High genomic diversity and candidate genes under selection associated with range expansion in eastern coyote (Canis latrans) populations.

Heppenheimer E, Brzeski KE, Hinton JW, Patterson BR, Rutledge LY, DeCandia AL, Wheeldon T, Fain SR, Hohenlohe PA, Kays R, White BN, Chamberlain MJ, vonHoldt BM.

Ecol Evol. 2018 Dec 4;8(24):12641-12655. doi: 10.1002/ece3.4688. eCollection 2018 Dec.

2.

Population Genomic Analysis of North American Eastern Wolves (Canis lycaon) Supports Their Conservation Priority Status.

Heppenheimer E, Harrigan RJ, Rutledge LY, Koepfli KP, DeCandia AL, Brzeski KE, Benson JF, Wheeldon T, Patterson BR, Kays R, Hohenlohe PA, von Holdt BM.

Genes (Basel). 2018 Dec 4;9(12). pii: E606. doi: 10.3390/genes9120606.

3.

Y-chromosome evidence supports asymmetric dog introgression into eastern coyotes.

Wheeldon TJ, Rutledge LY, Patterson BR, White BN, Wilson PJ.

Ecol Evol. 2013 Sep;3(9):3005-20. doi: 10.1002/ece3.693. Epub 2013 Jul 31.

4.

Spatial genetic and morphologic structure of wolves and coyotes in relation to environmental heterogeneity in a Canis hybrid zone.

Benson JF, Patterson BR, Wheeldon TJ.

Mol Ecol. 2012 Dec;21(24):5934-54. doi: 10.1111/mec.12045. Epub 2012 Nov 22.

PMID:
23173981
5.

Y-chromosome evidence supports widespread signatures of three-species Canis hybridization in eastern North America.

Wilson PJ, Rutledge LY, Wheeldon TJ, Patterson BR, White BN.

Ecol Evol. 2012 Sep;2(9):2325-32. doi: 10.1002/ece3.301. Epub 2012 Aug 13.

6.

Sympatric wolf and coyote populations of the western Great Lakes region are reproductively isolated.

Wheeldon TJ, Patterson BR, White BN.

Mol Ecol. 2010 Oct;19(20):4428-40. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04818.x. Epub 2010 Sep 13.

PMID:
20854277
7.

Colonization history and ancestry of northeastern coyotes.

Wheeldon T, Patterson B, White B.

Biol Lett. 2010 Apr 23;6(2):246-7; author reply 248-9. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2009.0822. Epub 2010 Jan 20. No abstract available.

8.

How the gray wolf got its color.

Rutledge LY, Wilson PJ, Kyle CJ, Wheeldon TJ, Patterson BR, White BN.

Science. 2009 Jul 3;325(5936):33-4; author reply 34. doi: 10.1126/science.325_33. No abstract available.

PMID:
19574371
9.

Genetic analysis of historic western Great Lakes region wolf samples reveals early Canis lupus/lycaon hybridization.

Wheeldon T, White BN.

Biol Lett. 2009 Feb 23;5(1):101-4. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2008.0516.

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