Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nutrients. 2015 Feb 16;7(2):1318-32. doi: 10.3390/nu7021318.

Association between dietary patterns during pregnancy and birth size measures in a diverse population in Southern US.

Author information

1
Department of Global Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Avenue, Washington, DC 20037, USA. uriyoan@gwu.edu.
2
Program in Physical Therapy, Department of Medicine, and Institute for Public Health, Washington University School of Medicine, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, Campus Box 8502, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA. racettes@wustl.edu.
3
Clinical and Developmental Psychology, Department of Psychology, Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, George Washington University, Room 304 Building GG 2125 St. NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA. ganiban@gwu.edu.
4
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 600 Jefferson St. Room 337 Memphis, TN 38105, USA. tnguye41@uthsc.edu.
5
Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 66 N. Pauline Street, Suite-633, Office 619, Memphis, TN 38105, USA. mkocak1@uthsc.edu.
6
Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 313 Oxford House, Nashville, TN 37232-4313, USA. kecia.carroll@vanderbilt.edu.
7
Department of Pediatrics (primary), Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, Research Building, 50 North Dunlap Street, Room 477R, Memphis, TN 38103, USA. evoelgyi@uthsc.edu.
8
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 600 Jefferson St. Room 337 Memphis, TN 38105, USA. ftylavsky@uthsc.edu.

Abstract

Despite increased interest in promoting nutrition during pregnancy, the association between maternal dietary patterns and birth outcomes has been equivocal. We examined maternal dietary patterns during pregnancy as a determinant of offspring's birth weight-for-length (WLZ), weight-for-age (WAZ), length-for-age (LAZ), and head circumference (HCZ) Z-scores in Southern United States (n=1151). Maternal diet during pregnancy was assessed by seven dietary patterns. Multivariable linear regression models described the association of WLZ, WAZ, LAZ, and HCZ with diet patterns controlling for other maternal and child characteristics. In bivariate analyses, WAZ and HCZ were significantly lower for processed and processed-Southern compared to healthy dietary patterns, whereas LAZ was significantly higher for these patterns. In the multivariate models, mothers who consumed a healthy-processed dietary pattern had children with significantly higher HCZ compared to the ones who consumed a healthy dietary pattern (HCZ β: 0.36; p=0.019). No other dietary pattern was significantly associated with any of the birth outcomes. Instead, the major outcome determinants were: African American race, pre-pregnancy BMI, and gestational weight gain. These findings justify further investigation about socio-environmental and genetic factors related to race and birth outcomes in this population.

PMID:
25690420
PMCID:
PMC4344590
DOI:
10.3390/nu7021318
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center