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Materials (Basel). 2020 Feb 12;13(4). pii: E840. doi: 10.3390/ma13040840.

Effect of Mill-Rejected Granular Cement Grains on Healing Concrete Cracks.

Author information

1
Civil Engineering, Jimma University Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 378, Jimma, Ethiopia.
2
Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1023, USA.

Abstract

The effect of mill-rejected granular cement (MRGC) on enabling concrete to autogenously heal its cracks was investigated. The crack-healing efficiency of concrete containing 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% wt. of MRGC as a replacement for natural fine aggregate was investigated at the age of 28 days. Concrete specimens were induced with artificial cracks and placed in water or air at 20 ± 2 °C to cure and heal the cracks for an additional 28 days. Compressive, flexural, and tensile strengths and water permeability tests were carried out to evaluate crack-healing by evaluating the strength to regain and the reduction in water permeability of concrete. For the air-cured specimens, the gain in compressive strength was between 45% and 79%, the flexural strength was between 74% and 87%, and the tensile strength was between 75% and 84% of the reference specimens for the MRGC content was between 0% and 20%, respectively. For the water-cured specimens, the gain in compressive strength was between 54% and 92%, the flexural strength was between 76% and 94%, the tensile strength was between 83% and 96% of the reference specimens for the MRGC content between 0% and 20%. The water permeability coefficients of the concrete specimens cured in water after cracking decreased by one order of magnitude, while those of the specimens cured in the air increased by the same order of magnitude. The crack-healing efficiency of concrete could be enhanced by increasing the MRGC content of concrete and hydration water.

KEYWORDS:

MRGC; artificial crack; crack healing; strength regain; water permeability

PMID:
32059602
DOI:
10.3390/ma13040840
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