Format
Sort by
Items per page

Send to

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 1 to 20 of 23

1.

Zinc for Infection Prevention in Sickle Cell Anemia (ZIPS): study protocol for a randomized placebo-controlled trial in Ugandan children with sickle cell anemia.

Datta D, Namazzi R, Conroy AL, Cusick SE, Hume HA, Tagoola A, Ware RE, Opoka RO, John CC.

Trials. 2019 Jul 26;20(1):460. doi: 10.1186/s13063-019-3569-z.

2.

The Benefits and Risks of Iron Supplementation in Pregnancy and Childhood.

Georgieff MK, Krebs NF, Cusick SE.

Annu Rev Nutr. 2019 Aug 21;39:121-146. doi: 10.1146/annurev-nutr-082018-124213. Epub 2019 May 15.

PMID:
31091416
3.

Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Cameroonian blood donors.

Lauden SM, Chongwain S, Achidi A, Helm E, Cusick SE, Krug A, Slusher TM, Lund TC.

BMC Res Notes. 2019 Apr 2;12(1):195. doi: 10.1186/s13104-019-4226-z.

4.

Piloting a Developmental Screening Tool Adapted for East African Children.

Sajady MA, Mehus CJ, Moody EC, Jaramillo EG, Mupere E, Barnes AJ, Cusick SE.

Children (Basel). 2018 Jul 26;5(8). pii: E101. doi: 10.3390/children5080101.

5.

Iron Deficiency is Prevalent among HIV-Infected Kenyan Adults and is Better Measured by Soluble Transferrin Receptor than Ferritin.

Frosch AEP, Ayodo G, Odhiambo EO, Ireland K, Vulule J, Cusick SE.

Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2018 Aug;99(2):439-444. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.18-0208. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

6.

Assessment of blood levels of heavy metals including lead and manganese in healthy children living in the Katanga settlement of Kampala, Uganda.

Cusick SE, Jaramillo EG, Moody EC, Ssemata AS, Bitwayi D, Lund TC, Mupere E.

BMC Public Health. 2018 Jun 8;18(1):717. doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-5589-0.

7.

Nutritional influences on brain development.

Georgieff MK, Ramel SE, Cusick SE.

Acta Paediatr. 2018 Aug;107(8):1310-1321. doi: 10.1111/apa.14287. Epub 2018 Mar 22. Review.

8.

Approaches for Reducing the Risk of Early-Life Iron Deficiency-Induced Brain Dysfunction in Children.

Cusick SE, Georgieff MK, Rao R.

Nutrients. 2018 Feb 17;10(2). pii: E227. doi: 10.3390/nu10020227. Review.

9.

Delaying the start of iron until 28 days after antimalarial treatment is associated with lower incidence of subsequent illness in children with malaria and iron deficiency.

Jaramillo EG, Mupere E, Opoka RO, Hodges JS, Lund TC, Georgieff MK, John CC, Cusick SE.

PLoS One. 2017 Aug 30;12(8):e0183977. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0183977. eCollection 2017.

10.

Markers of oxidative stress in umbilical cord blood from G6PD deficient African newborns.

Stadem PS, Hilgers MV, Bengo D, Cusick SE, Ndidde S, Slusher TM, Lund TC.

PLoS One. 2017 Feb 24;12(2):e0172980. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172980. eCollection 2017.

11.

Iron, Inflammation, and Malaria in the Pregnant Woman and Her Child: Saving Lives, Saving Brains.

Cusick SE, John CC.

Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2016 Oct 5;95(4):739-740. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.16-0533. Epub 2016 Aug 1. No abstract available.

12.

Delaying Iron Therapy until 28 Days after Antimalarial Treatment Is Associated with Greater Iron Incorporation and Equivalent Hematologic Recovery after 56 Days in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Cusick SE, Opoka RO, Abrams SA, John CC, Georgieff MK, Mupere E.

J Nutr. 2016 Sep;146(9):1769-74. doi: 10.3945/jn.116.233239. Epub 2016 Jun 29.

13.

The Role of Nutrition in Brain Development: The Golden Opportunity of the "First 1000 Days".

Cusick SE, Georgieff MK.

J Pediatr. 2016 Aug;175:16-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.05.013. Epub 2016 Jun 3. No abstract available.

14.

Comparison of iron status 28 d after provision of antimalarial treatment with iron therapy compared with antimalarial treatment alone in Ugandan children with severe malaria.

Cusick SE, Opoka RO, Ssemata AS, Georgieff MK, John CC.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Mar;103(3):919-25. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.115.117820. Epub 2016 Feb 3.

15.

Vitamin D insufficiency is common in Ugandan children and is associated with severe malaria.

Cusick SE, Opoka RO, Lund TC, John CC, Polgreen LE.

PLoS One. 2014 Dec 3;9(12):e113185. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0113185. eCollection 2014.

16.

Decline in childhood iron deficiency after interruption of malaria transmission in highland Kenya.

Frosch AE, Ondigo BN, Ayodo GA, Vulule JM, John CC, Cusick SE.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Sep;100(3):968-73. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.114.087114. Epub 2014 Jul 30.

17.

Determinants of undernutrition and overnutrition among adolescents in developing countries.

Cusick SE, Kuch AE.

Adolesc Med State Art Rev. 2012 Dec;23(3):440-56. Review. No abstract available.

18.

Nutrient supplementation and neurodevelopment: timing is the key.

Cusick SE, Georgieff MK.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012 May;166(5):481-2. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.199. No abstract available.

PMID:
22566551
19.

Assessment of iron status in US pregnant women from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2006.

Mei Z, Cogswell ME, Looker AC, Pfeiffer CM, Cusick SE, Lacher DA, Grummer-Strawn LM.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Jun;93(6):1312-20. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.110.007195. Epub 2011 Mar 23.

PMID:
21430118
20.

Unexplained decline in the prevalence of anemia among US children and women between 1988-1994 and 1999-2002.

Cusick SE, Mei Z, Freedman DS, Looker AC, Ogden CL, Gunter E, Cogswell ME.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Dec;88(6):1611-7. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2008.25926.

PMID:
19064522

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center