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Sci Rep. 2018 Nov 12;8(1):16708. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-35058-3.

Correlation between genomic index lesions and mpMRI and 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT imaging features in primary prostate cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 517, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
2
Interdisciplinary Center for Bioinformatics, University of Leipzig, Härtelstrasse 16-18, D-04107, Leipzig, Germany.
3
Division of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Imaging Division, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584, CX Utrecht, The Netherlands.
5
Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
6
Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
7
Cancer Therapeutics Program and Department of Pathology, Hillman Cancer Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 5117 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA.
8
Department of Medical Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 460, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
9
Division of Medical Image Computing, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
10
Hamamatsu Tissue Imaging and Analysis Center (TIGA), BIOQUANT, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 267, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
11
Functional Epigenomics, Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), University of Cologne, Robert-Koch-Strasse 21, D-50931, Cologne, Germany.
12
Department of Urology, University Hospital Nuremberg, Nuremberg, Germany.
13
Pathology of the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck and the Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Lung Center, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538 Lübeck and Parkallee 1-40, D-23845, Borstel, Germany.
14
Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 224, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
15
Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
16
Pathology Rosenheim, Rosenheim, Germany.
17
Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
18
Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
19
Department of Urology, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany.
20
Cancer Genome Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Im Neuenheimer Feld 460, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany. h.sueltmann@dkfz-heidelberg.de.
21
Department of Urology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 517, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany. stefan.duensing@med.uni-heidelberg.de.
22
Molecular Urooncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 517, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany. stefan.duensing@med.uni-heidelberg.de.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA)- positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT)-imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) are emerging techniques to assess the presence of significant disease and tumor progression. It is not known, however, whether and to what extent lesions detected by these imaging techniques correlate with genomic features of PCa. The aim of this study was therefore to define a genomic index lesion based on chromosomal copy number alterations (CNAs) as marker for tumor aggressiveness in prostate biopsies in direct correlation to multiparametric (mp) MRI and 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT imaging features. CNA profiles of 46 biopsies from five consecutive patients with clinically high-risk PCa were obtained from radiologically suspicious and unsuspicious areas. All patients underwent mpMRI, MRI/TRUS-fusion biopsy, 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT and a radical prostatectomy. CNAs were directly correlated to imaging features and radiogenomic analyses were performed. Highly significant CNAs (≥10 Mbp) were found in 22 of 46 biopsies. Chromosome 8p, 13q and 5q losses were the most common findings. There was an strong correspondence between the radiologic and the genomic index lesions. The radiogenomic analyses suggest the feasibility of developing radiologic signatures that can distinguish between genomically more or less aggressive lesions. In conclusion, imaging features of mpMRI and 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT can guide to the genomically most aggressive lesion of a PCa. Radiogenomics may help to better differentiate between indolent and aggressive PCa in the future.

PMID:
30420756
PMCID:
PMC6232089
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-018-35058-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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