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Plant Cell Environ. 2018 Jun;41(6):1427-1437. doi: 10.1111/pce.13180. Epub 2018 Apr 20.

Leaf and canopy photosynthesis of a chlorophyll deficient soybean mutant.

Author information

1
Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Sternwartestrasse 15, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria.
2
Department of Meteorology, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Piatkowska Street 94, 60-649, Poznan, Poland.
3
Sustainable Agro-Ecosystems and Bioresources Department, Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Via E. Mach 1, 38010, San Michele all'Adige, Trento, Italy.
4
Department of Agricultural, Food, Environmental and Animal Sciences, University of Udine, Via delle Scienze 206, 33100, Udine, Italy.
5
Institute of Biometeorology, National Research Council (CNR-IBIMET), Via Caproni 8, 50145, Florence, Italy.
6
Foxlab Joint CNR-FEM Initiative, Via E. Mach 1, 38010, San Michele all'Adige, Trento, Italy.
7
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126, Milan, Italy.
8
Tree and Timber Institute, National Research Council (CNR-IVALSA), Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence, Italy.
9
University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 55108, USA.
10
Institut Méditerranéen de Biodiversité et d'Ecologie Marine et Continentale (IMBE), Aix Marseille Université, Université Avigon, CNRS 7263/IRD 237, 3 Place Victor Hugo, 13331, Marseille Cedex 03, France.
11
Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, IBG-2: Plant Sciences, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Str, 52425, Jülich, Germany.
12
IMèRA, Institut D'Etudes Avancés de l'Universitè Aix-Marseille, 2 Place Le Verrier, 13004, Marseille, France.

Abstract

The photosynthetic, optical, and morphological characteristics of a chlorophyll-deficient (Chl-deficient) "yellow" soybean mutant (MinnGold) were examined in comparison with 2 green varieties (MN0095 and Eiko). Despite the large difference in Chl content, similar leaf photosynthesis rates were maintained in the Chl-deficient mutant by offsetting the reduced absorption of red photons by a small increase in photochemical efficiency and lower non-photochemical quenching. When grown in the field, at full canopy cover, the mutants reflected a significantly larger proportion of incoming shortwave radiation, but the total canopy light absorption was only slightly reduced, most likely due to a deeper penetration of light into the canopy space. As a consequence, canopy-scale gross primary production and ecosystem respiration were comparable between the Chl-deficient mutant and the green variety. However, total biomass production was lower in the mutant, which indicates that processes other than steady state photosynthesis caused a reduction in biomass accumulation over time. Analysis of non-photochemical quenching relaxation and gas exchange in Chl-deficient and green leaves after transitions from high to low light conditions suggested that dynamic photosynthesis might be responsible for the reduced biomass production in the Chl-deficient mutant under field conditions.

KEYWORDS:

NPQ relaxation; steady state and dynamic photosynthesis

PMID:
29498070
DOI:
10.1111/pce.13180
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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