Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sensors (Basel). 2015 Jun 24;15(7):14864-70. doi: 10.3390/s150714864.

Non-Invasive Optical Sensor Based Approaches for Monitoring Virus Culture to Minimize BSL3 Laboratory Entry.

Author information

1
LMV/DETTD/OBRR/CBER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD 20993, USA. viswanath.ragupathy@fda.hhs.gov.
2
LMV/DETTD/OBRR/CBER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD 20993, USA. Mohan.Haleyurgirisetty@fda.hhs.gov.
3
Center for Advanced Sensor Technology and Department of Chemical, Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, MD 21250, USA. kostov@umbc.edu.
4
Center for Advanced Sensor Technology and Department of Chemical, Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, MD 21250, USA. xge1@umbc.edu.
5
Center for Advanced Sensor Technology and Department of Chemical, Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, MD 21250, USA. shaunak1@umbc.edu.
6
LMV/DETTD/OBRR/CBER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD 20993, USA. Indira.Hewlett@fda.hhs.gov.
7
Center for Advanced Sensor Technology and Department of Chemical, Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, MD 21250, USA. grao@umbc.edu.

Abstract

High titers of infectious viruses for vaccine and diagnostic reference panel development are made by infecting susceptible mammalian cells. Laboratory procedures are strictly performed in a Bio-Safety Level-3 (BSL3) laboratory and each entry and exit involves the use of  disposable Personnel Protective Equipment (PPE) to observe cell culture conditions. Routine PPE use involves significant recurring costs. Alternative non-invasive optical sensor based approaches to remotely monitor cell culture may provide a promising and cost effective approach to monitor infectious virus cultures resulting in lower disruption and costs. We report here the monitoring of high titer cultures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2) remotely with the use of optical oxygen sensors aseptically placed inside the cell culture vessel. The replacement of culture media for cell and virus propagation and virus load monitoring was effectively performed using this fluorescent sensor and resulted in half the number of visits to the BSL3 lab (five versus ten).

KEYWORDS:

BSL3 use; monitoring; optical sensor; virus cell culture

PMID:
26115456
PMCID:
PMC4541811
DOI:
10.3390/s150714864
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center