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Ind Labor Relat Rev. 2015 Aug;68(4):916-954. Epub 2015 Jun 1.

WORK CONTINUATION WHILE TREATED FOR BREAST CANCER: THE ROLE OF WORKPLACE ACCOMMODATIONS.

Author information

1
David Neumark is a Professor in the Department of Economics, and Director of the Center for Economics & Public Policy, University of California, Irvine; a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research; and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). Cathy J. Bradley is a Professor in the Department of Healthcare Policy and Research and the Massey Cancer Center at the Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia. Miguel Henry is an Economist in the Actuarial and Economic Division of the National Council on Compensation Insurance. Bassam Dahman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Healthcare Policy and Research at the Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.

Abstract

Given the short- and long-term disabilities associated with breast cancer and its treatment, the authors investigate the influence of workplace accommodations on the employment and hours worked of women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Accommodations that allow women to work fewer hours or that ease the burden of work could also generate health benefits by reducing workplace demands and allowing women more time to tend to treatment needs and recovery. In prior research, the authors found modest labor supply impacts on employment for this group of women. Evidence from this study suggests that some accommodations are associated with fewer hours worked, while some are associated with higher employment or hours. In addition, some of the accommodations that may affect hours of work-sometimes positively and sometimes negatively-are associated with positive health benefits.

KEYWORDS:

breast cancer; labor supply; workplace accommodations

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