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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Dec 22;15(1). pii: E7. doi: 10.3390/ijerph15010007.

Personal, Psychosocial and Environmental Factors Related to Sick Building Syndrome in Official Employees of Taiwan.

Author information

1
Department of Sport and Health Management, Da-Yeh University, Changhua 51591, Taiwan. chungyen@mail.dyu.edu.tw.
2
Department of Sport and Health Management, Da-Yeh University, Changhua 51591, Taiwan. dykama@mail.dyu.edu.tw.
3
Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40447, Taiwan. b8507006@gmail.com.
4
Department of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40447, Taiwan. u100030033@cmu.edu.tw.
5
Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40447, Taiwan. fcsung1008@yahoo.com.
6
Department of Health Services Administration, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan. fcsung1008@yahoo.com.
7
Department of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan. wucc@mail.cmu.edu.tw.

Abstract

Sick building syndrome (SBS) is a combination of symptoms that can be attributed to exposure to specific building conditions. The present study recruited 389 participants aged 20-65 years from 87 offices of 16 institutions to examine if personal factors, work-related psychosocial stress, and work environments, were associated with five groups of SBS symptoms, including symptoms for eyes, upper respiratory tract, lower respiratory tract, skin, and non-specific systems. Indoor environmental conditions were monitored. Data were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression (MLR) analyses and were reported as adjusted Odds Ratios (aOR). SBS symptoms for eyes were associated with older age, sensitivity to tobacco, and low indoor air flow. Upper respiratory symptoms were related to smoking, low social support, longer work days, and dry air. High indoor air flow was associated with reduced upper respiratory symptoms (aOR = 0.29; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.13-0.67). Lower respiratory symptoms were associated with high work pressure, longer work hours, chemical exposure, migraine, and exposure to new interior painting. Recent interior painting exposure was associated with a high estimated relative risk of low respiratory symptoms (aOR = 20.6; 95% CI = 2.96-143). Smoking, longer work days, low indoor air flow, indoor dryness, and volatile organics exposure, were associated with other non-specified symptoms including headache, tiredness, difficulty concentrating, anger, and dizziness. In conclusion, there are various SBS symptoms associated with different personal characteristics, psychosocial, and environmental factors. Psychosocial factors had stronger relationships with lower respiratory symptoms than with other types of SBS symptoms. Good ventilation could reduce risk factors and may relieve SBS symptoms.

KEYWORDS:

building-related symptoms; indoor air; psychosocial stress; sick building syndrome; work environment

PMID:
29271881
PMCID:
PMC5800107
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph15010007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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