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Antioxidants (Basel). 2018 Jun 4;7(6). pii: E75. doi: 10.3390/antiox7060075.

Identification of Phenolic Compounds-Rich Grape Pomace Extracts Urine Metabolites and Correlation with Gut Microbiota Modulation.

Author information

1
Centre d'Analyses et de Recherche, UR GPF, Laboratoire CTA, Faculté des Sciences, Université Saint-Joseph, B.P. 11-514 Riad El Solh, Beirut 1107 2050, Lebanon. stephanie.chacar@net.usj.edu.lb.
2
Laboratoire de Recherche en Physiologie et Physiopathologie, LRPP, Pôle Technologie Santé, Faculté de Médecine, Université Saint Joseph, B.P. 11-514 Riad El Solh, Beirut 1107 2050, Lebanon. stephanie.chacar@net.usj.edu.lb.
3
Laboratoire Signalisation et Transports Ioniques Membranaires (STIM), Université de Poitiers EA 7349, 86000 Poitiers, France. stephanie.chacar@net.usj.edu.lb.
4
Institut de Chimie des Milieux et Matériaux de Poitiers (IC2MP), Université de Poitiers UMR CNRS 7285, 86000 Poitiers, France. mehrad.tarighi@univ-poitiers.fr.
5
Laboratoire de Recherche en Physiologie et Physiopathologie, LRPP, Pôle Technologie Santé, Faculté de Médecine, Université Saint Joseph, B.P. 11-514 Riad El Solh, Beirut 1107 2050, Lebanon. nassim.fares@usj.edu.lb.
6
Laboratoire Signalisation et Transports Ioniques Membranaires (STIM), Université de Poitiers EA 7349, 86000 Poitiers, France. jean-francois.faivre@univ-poitiers.fr.
7
Centre d'Analyses et de Recherche, UR GPF, Laboratoire CTA, Faculté des Sciences, Université Saint-Joseph, B.P. 11-514 Riad El Solh, Beirut 1107 2050, Lebanon. nicolas.louka@usj.edu.lb.
8
Centre d'Analyses et de Recherche, UR GPF, Laboratoire CTA, Faculté des Sciences, Université Saint-Joseph, B.P. 11-514 Riad El Solh, Beirut 1107 2050, Lebanon. richard.maroun@usj.edu.lb.

Abstract

The high diversity of phenolic compounds (PC) found in food matrices makes it challenging to analyze their bioavailability and their impact on health and functional metabolism. It is well recognized that PC do modulate the composition of the gut microbiota (GM), however, the literature still lacks significant data concerning the link between the metabolic fate of the ingested compounds and their bioactivity, mainly when considering the secondary metabolites produced. In this study, we assessed the metabolic fate of PC for a period covering 14 months of daily intake to identify the metabolites that could be responsible for the effects of PC on the GM observed in our previous work. Urinary analysis of polyphenol metabolites was performed using a high resolution mass spectrometry LC-QTOF-MS method. Among the sixteen metabolites identified, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid were detected simultaneously and, therefore, correlated with the growth of Bifidobacterium in the rat GM. In addition, Daidzedin, detected only at 14 months post-treatment, mostly interfered with the growth inhibition of Clostridium (Cluster I). In conclusion, the impact of the long-term intake of PC on rat GM seems to be related to specific metabolites produced after ingestion of the parental compounds and this may also be due to their additional synergistic effects.

KEYWORDS:

aging; antioxidants; gut microbiota; phenolic compounds; urinary metabolites

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