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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Feb 7;15(2). pii: E286. doi: 10.3390/ijerph15020286.

Clinical Aspects of Foot Health in Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease.

Author information

1
Research, Health and Podiatry Unit, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Nursing and Podiatry, Universidade da Coruña, 15403 Ferrol, Spain. daniellopez@udc.es.
2
Research, Health and Podiatry Unit, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Nursing and Podiatry, Universidade da Coruña, 15403 Ferrol, Spain. martagrela95@gmail.com.
3
Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad Rey Juan, 28922 Carlos, Spain. marta.losa@urjc.es.
4
Nursing and Physical Therapy Department, Institute of Biomedicine (IBIOMED), Universidad de León, 24401 Ponferrada, Spain. ccall@unileon.es.
5
Research Group, Faculty of Health, Exercise and Sport, European University of Madrid, 28670 Villaviciosa de Odón, Spain. davidrodriguezsanz@gmail.com.
6
University Center of Plasencia, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz, Spain. patibiom@unex.es.
7
School of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Podiatry, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain. ribebeva@ucm.es.

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) shows a marked presence of physiologic changes and the start or aggravation of underlying diseases such as physical frailty in diverse anatomical regions. It is believed to have a particularly harmful effect on the health of the foot. We examined the foot health status in older persons with AD, with a specific focus on the extent to which people with AD may be using inadequate footwear in old age. Seventy-three community-dwelling people with probable, mild to moderate AD aged 65-95 years were recruited from a center of excellence for AD. A single trained physician evaluated health status and foot conditions. Current shoe and foot length and width measurements were taken using a calibrated Brannock device. The results indicate that sixty-five participants (89.04%) suffered from feet problems. Also, only twenty-two subjects (30.14%) used the correct shoes in width and size related with the morphology of their feet. Fifty-one participants (69.86%) were using incorrect shoes in length or width. The present study revealed that peoples with AD had a high presence of foot health problems. Also, the use of inappropriate shoes revealed measurable differences of association between shoe size and the morphology of the foot.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; foot diseases; joint flexibility; musculoskeletal system; shoes

PMID:
29414905
PMCID:
PMC5858355
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph15020286
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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