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Materials (Basel). 2016 Jan 4;9(1). pii: E24. doi: 10.3390/ma9010024.

Preparation and Characterization of Inorganic PCM Microcapsules by Fluidized Bed Method.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical Engineering and Mineral Processing and Center for Advanced Study of Lithium and Industrial Minerals (CELiMIN), University of Antofagasta, Av. Universidad de Antofagasta 02800, Campus Coloso, Antofagasta 127300, Chile. svetlana.ushak@uantof.cl.
2
Solar Energy Research Center (SERC-Chile), Av Tupper 2007, Piso 4, Santiago 8370451, Chile. svetlana.ushak@uantof.cl.
3
Department of Chemical Engineering and Mineral Processing and Center for Advanced Study of Lithium and Industrial Minerals (CELiMIN), University of Antofagasta, Av. Universidad de Antofagasta 02800, Campus Coloso, Antofagasta 127300, Chile. mjudith.cruz@uantof.cl.
4
GREA Innovació Concurrent, Edifici CREA, Universitat de Lleida, Pere de Cabrera s/n, Lleida 25001, Spain. lcabeza@diei.udl.cat.
5
Department of Chemical Engineering and Mineral Processing and Center for Advanced Study of Lithium and Industrial Minerals (CELiMIN), University of Antofagasta, Av. Universidad de Antofagasta 02800, Campus Coloso, Antofagasta 127300, Chile. mario.grageda@uantof.cl.
6
Solar Energy Research Center (SERC-Chile), Av Tupper 2007, Piso 4, Santiago 8370451, Chile. mario.grageda@uantof.cl.

Abstract

The literature shows that inorganic phase change materials (PCM) have been very seldom microencapsulated, so this study aims to contribute to filling this research gap. Bischofite, a by-product from the non-metallic industry identified as having good potential to be used as inorganic PCM, was microencapsulated by means of a fluidized bed method with acrylic as polymer and chloroform as solvent, after compatibility studies of both several solvents and several polymers. The formation of bischofite and pure MgCl₂·6H₂O microcapsules was investigated and analyzed. Results showed an efficiency in microencapsulation of 95% could be achieved when using 2 min of fluidization time and 2 kg/h of atomization flow. The final microcapsules had excellent melting temperatures and enthalpy compared to the original PCM, 104.6 °C and 95 J/g for bischofite, and 95.3 and 118.3 for MgCl₂·6H₂O.

KEYWORDS:

MgCl2·6H2O; bischofite; fluidization; inorganic; microencapsulation; phase change material

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