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Food Chem Toxicol. 2019 Nov;133:110802. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2019.110802. Epub 2019 Sep 5.

Effects of the Hyptis martiusii Benth. leaf essential oil and 1,8-cineole (eucalyptol) on the central nervous system of mice.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Pharmacology of Natural Products, Regional University of Cariri, 1161 Cel., Antonio Luis St, 63105-000, Crato, CE, Brazil.
2
Laboratory of Molecular Chemistry and Pharmacology, Regional University of Cariri, 1161 Cel., Antonio Luis St, 63105-000, Crato, CE, Brazil. Electronic address: Irwin.alencar@urca.br.
3
Laboratory of Pharmacology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine Estácio of Juazeiro do Norte, 515 Tenente Raimundo Rocha Av, 63048-080, Juazeiro do Norte, CE, Brazil.
4
Laboratory of Pharmacology of Natural Products, Regional University of Cariri, 1161 Cel., Antonio Luis St, 63105-000, Crato, CE, Brazil; Laboratory of Pharmacology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine Estácio of Juazeiro do Norte, 515 Tenente Raimundo Rocha Av, 63048-080, Juazeiro do Norte, CE, Brazil.
5
Laboratory of Experimental Pharmacology and Biochemistry, Federal University of Paraíba, Cidade Universitária St, 58051-900, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Electronic address: cicerof@hotmail.com.
6
Laboratory of Pharmacology of Natural Products, Regional University of Cariri, 1161 Cel., Antonio Luis St, 63105-000, Crato, CE, Brazil. Electronic address: martareginakerntopfm@outlook.com.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to characterize the central effects of the Hyptis martiusii leaf essential oil (OEHM) and 1,8-cineole (eucalyptol) using behavioral animal models. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to characterize the chemical compounds present in the OEHM. For the behavioral tests, female Swiss mice treated with the OEHM (25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) and 1,8-cineole (50 mg/kg, i.p.) were used and subjected to the following tests: open field, elevated cross maze, rotarod, sodium pentobarbital- or ethyl ether-induced sleep time, pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsions, haloperidol-induced catalepsy, and ketamine-induced hyperkinesia. GC/MS analysis identified 20 constituents with the majority of them being monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, with eucalyptol (1,8-cineol), the major sample compound (25.93%), standing out. The results showed the OEHM (25, 50 100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) and its major compound (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced animal motility in the open field test, increased pentobarbital- and ethyl ether-induced sleep time, as well as death latency in the pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsion model. However, the tested compounds were devoid of anxiolytic-like and myorelaxant activity. In addition, the OEHM (100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) and 1,8-cineole (50 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated haloperidol-induced catalepsy and reduced ketamine-induced hyperkinesia. Taken together, the results suggest the OEHM has important hypnotic-sedative and antipsychotic-like effects, which appear to be due to the monoterpene 1,8-cineole, the major compound identified in the essential oil.

KEYWORDS:

1,8-cineole; Antipsychotic-like effect; Essential oil; Hypnotic-sedative effect; Hyptis martiusii

PMID:
31493462
DOI:
10.1016/j.fct.2019.110802
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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