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Int Health. 2019 May 1;11(3):163-165. doi: 10.1093/inthealth/ihy094.

Household water sharing: a missing link in international health.

Author information

1
Department of Geography, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA.
2
Department of Public Health Sciences, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.
3
School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
4
Center for Global Health, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
5
Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
6
Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
7
Department of Biobehavioral Health, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
8
Department of Anthropology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
9
Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.

Abstract

Water insecurity massively undermines health, especially among impoverished and marginalized communities. Emerging evidence shows that household-to-household water sharing is a widespread coping strategy in vulnerable communities. Sharing can buffer households from the deleterious health effects that typically accompany seasonal shortages, interruptions of water services and natural disasters. Conversely, sharing may also increase exposure to pathogens and become burdensome and distressing in times of heightened need. These water sharing systems have been almost invisible within global health research but need to be explored, because they can both support and undermine global public health interventions, planning and policy.

KEYWORDS:

multiple water sources; water insecurity; water policy; water sharing

PMID:
30576501
PMCID:
PMC6484635
[Available on 2020-05-01]
DOI:
10.1093/inthealth/ihy094

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