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Healthcare (Basel). 2019 Jun 10;7(2). pii: E75. doi: 10.3390/healthcare7020075.

Integrating Diverse Disciplines to Enhance Interprofessional Competency in Healthcare Delivery.

Author information

1
School of Biomedical Informatics, University of Texas Health Science Center (UT Health), Houston, TX 77030, USA. tiffany.champagne@uth.tmc.edu.
2
School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. frances.lee.revere@uth.tmc.edu.
3
Cizik School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center, Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Mariya.Tankimovich@uth.tmc.edu.
4
Cizik School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center, Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Erica.Yu@uth.tmc.edu.
5
School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Robert.D.Spears@uth.tmc.edu.
6
McGovern Medical School, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Jennifer.L.Swails@uth.tmc.edu.

Abstract

Interprofessional education (IPE) typically involves clinical simulation exercises with students from medical and nursing schools. Yet, healthcare requires patient-centered teams that include diverse disciplines. Students from public health and informatics are rarely incorporated into IPE, signaling a gap in current educational practices. In this study, we integrated students from administrative and non-clinical disciplines into traditional clinical simulations and measured the effect on communication and teamwork. From July 2017-July 2018, 408 students from five schools (medicine, nursing, dentistry, public health, and informatics) participated in one of eight three-hour IPE clinical simulations with Standardized Patients and electronic health record technologies. Data were gathered using a pre-test-post-test interventional Interprofessional Collaborative Competency Attainment Survey (ICCAS) and through qualitative evaluations from Standardized Patients. Of the total 408 students, 386 (94.6%) had matched pre- and post-test results from the surveys. There was a 15.9% improvement in collaboration overall between the pre- and post-tests. ICCAS competencies showed improvements in teamwork, communication, collaboration, and conflict management, with an average change from 5.26 to 6.10 (t = 35.16; p < 0.001). We found by creating new clinical simulations with additional roles for non-clinical professionals, student learners were able to observe and learn interprofessional teamwork from each other and from faculty role models.

KEYWORDS:

electronic health record; interprofessional education; medical education; simulation-based education; standardized patients

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