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Dermatol Surg. 2018 Dec;44(12):1501-1508. doi: 10.1097/DSS.0000000000001603.

Responses to Topical Diphenylcyclopropenone as an Adjunct Treatment for In-Transit Melanoma: A Tertiary Referral Center Experience.

Author information

1
Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, Rochester, Minnesota.
2
Departments of Surgery, and.
3
Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In-transit cutaneous metastases occur in 5% to 10% of patients with melanoma. Recently, topical diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) has been described as a treatment option.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate efficacy of DPCP in treatment of in-transit cutaneous melanoma.

METHODS:

The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of 13 consecutive patients with in-transit metastases treated with topical DPCP between March 1, 2013, and January 31, 2017. The authors recorded the response of in-transit cutaneous melanoma lesions treated with DPCP measured by clinical examination.

RESULTS:

Among the 13 patients, 9 patients completed at least a 1-month course of DPCP treatment. Of these 9 patients, 6 (66.7%) maintained either stable disease or had a partial or complete regression, and 3 (33.3%) had progressive disease. Patients with less burden of disease (e.g., <15 lesions) responded more favorably than those with a greater burden of disease (e.g., >25 lesions or plaques). Both patients who received DPCP alone had progression of their cutaneous lesions. One patient who did not become sensitized to DPCP died within 2 months, and his anergy likely reflecting immense burden of disease.

CONCLUSION:

Topical DPCP is a low-cost, patient-applied treatment option for in-transit melanoma, most effective for patients with relatively low tumor burden and localized disease.

PMID:
29985863
DOI:
10.1097/DSS.0000000000001603
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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