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J R Soc Interface. 2014 Oct 6;11(99). pii: 20140627. doi: 10.1098/rsif.2014.0627.

Geckoprinting: assembly of microelectronic devices on unconventional surfaces by transfer printing with isolated gecko setal arrays.

Author information

1
Department of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 123 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 123 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea Research Institute for Solar and Sustainable Energies, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 123 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Biology, Lewis & Clark College, Portland, OR, USA.
4
Department of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 123 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea Research Institute for Solar and Sustainable Energies, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 123 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea jong@gist.ac.kr.

Abstract

Developing electronics in unconventional forms provides opportunities to expand the use of electronics in diverse applications including bio-integrated or implanted electronics. One of the key challenges lies in integrating semiconductor microdevices onto unconventional substrates without glue, high pressure or temperature that may cause damage to microdevices, substrates or interfaces. This paper describes a solution based on natural gecko setal arrays that switch adhesion mechanically on and off, enabling pick and place manipulation of thin microscale semiconductor materials onto diverse surfaces including plants and insects whose surfaces are usually rough and irregular. A demonstration of functional 'geckoprinted' microelectronic devices provides a proof of concept of our results in practical applications.

KEYWORDS:

adhesive; flexible electronics; gecko; seta; solar microcell; transfer printing

PMID:
25056216
PMCID:
PMC4233745
DOI:
10.1098/rsif.2014.0627
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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