Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nutrients. 2017 Jul 22;9(7). pii: E790. doi: 10.3390/nu9070790.

Prenatal Vitamin D Intake, Cord Blood 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, and Offspring Body Composition: The Healthy Start Study.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. katherine.sauder@ucdenver.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Hallie.koeppen@mt.gov.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Allison.shapiro@ucdenver.edu.
4
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Kathryn.kalata@ucdenver.edu.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Alexandra.stamatoiu@ucdenver.edu.
6
Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Brandy.ringham@ucdenver.edu.
7
Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Deborah.glueck@ucdenver.edu.
8
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Jill.Norris@ucdenver.edu.
9
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Dana.Dabelea@ucdenver.edu.
10
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Dana.Dabelea@ucdenver.edu.

Abstract

Vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy may be associated with increased offspring adiposity, but evidence from human studies is inconclusive. We examined associations between prenatal vitamin D intake, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in cord blood, and offspring size and body composition at birth and 5 months. Participants included 605 mother-offspring dyads from the Healthy Start study, an ongoing, pre-birth prospective cohort study in Denver, Colorado, USA. Prenatal vitamin D intake was assessed with diet recalls and questionnaires, and offspring body composition was measured via air displacement plethysmography at birth and 5 months. General linear univariate models were used for analysis, adjusting for maternal age, race/ethnicity, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), offspring sex, and gestational age at birth. Non-Hispanic white race, lower pre-pregnancy BMI, higher prenatal vitamin D intake, and summer births were associated with higher cord blood 25(OH)D. Higher 25(OH)D was associated with lower birthweight (β = -6.22, p = 0.02), but as maternal BMI increased, this association became increasingly positive in direction and magnitude (β = 1.05, p = 0.04). Higher 25(OH)D was also associated with lower neonatal adiposity (β = -0.02, p < 0.05) but not after adjustment for maternal BMI (β = -0.01, p = 0.25). Cord blood 25(OH)D was not associated with offspring size or body composition at 5 months. Our data confirm the hypothesis that vitamin D exposure in early life is associated with neonatal body size and composition. Future research is needed to understand the implications of these associations as infants grow.

KEYWORDS:

adiposity; birth; body composition; pregnancy; vitamin D

PMID:
28737667
PMCID:
PMC5537904
DOI:
10.3390/nu9070790
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center