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Medicina (Kaunas). 2019 Feb 17;55(2). pii: E55. doi: 10.3390/medicina55020055.

Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Evaluating Fetal Brain and Abdomen Malformations during Pregnancy.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Vilnius University, M. K. Čiurlionio g. 21, 03101 Vilnius, Lithuania. nomeda.valeviciene@santa.lt.
2
Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius University, M. K. Čiurlionio g. 21, 03101 Vilnius, Lithuania. g.varyte@gmail.com.
3
Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Vilnius University Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Vilnius University Hospital Santaros Clinics, Santariškių g. 2, 08661 Vilnius, Lithuania. jolita.zakareviciene@santa.lt.
4
Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Vilnius University Centre of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Treatment, Vilnius University Hospital Santaros Clinics, Santariškių g. 2, 08661 Vilnius, Lithuania. egle.kontrimaviciute@santa.lt.
5
Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Vilnius University Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Vilnius University Hospital Santaros Clinics, Santariškių g. 2, 08661 Vilnius, Lithuania. diana.ramasauskaite@santa.lt.
6
Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Vilnius University, M. K. Čiurlionio g. 21, 03101 Vilnius, Lithuania. dileta.rutkauskaite@santa.lt.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used as a clarifying technique after a high-resolution ultrasound examination during pregnancy. Combining ultrasound with MRI, additional diagnostic information is obtained or ultrasound diagnosis is frequently corrected. High spatial resolution provides accurate radiological imaging of internal organs and widens possibilities for detecting perinatal development disorders. The safety of MRI and the use of intravenous contrast agent gadolinium are discussed in this article. There is no currently available evidence that MRI is harmful to the fetus, although not enough research has been carried out to prove enduring safety. MRI should be performed when the benefit outweighs the potential side effects. The narrative review includes several clinical cases of fetal MRI performed in Vilnius University Hospital Santaros Clinics.

KEYWORDS:

fetal MRI; gadolinium; pregnancy

PMID:
30781564
PMCID:
PMC6410250
DOI:
10.3390/medicina55020055
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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