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J Public Health (Oxf). 2015 Sep;37(3):419-26. doi: 10.1093/pubmed/fdu062. Epub 2014 Aug 30.

Racial/ethnic and gender differences in the association between depressive symptoms and higher body mass index.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Michigan - Flint, Flint, MI 48502, USA International Institute, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
2
School of Public Health, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
3
Department of Earth and Resource Science, University of Michigan - Flint, Flint, MI 48502, USA.
4
Genesee County Health Department, Flint, MI 48502, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

The study investigated the socio-demographic differences in the association between depressive symptoms and higher body mass index (BMI).

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

In Genesee County, Michigan, random samples of households were drawn from all residential census tracts. The Speak to Your Health! Survey was administered among adults aged 18 years and older in these households. To conduct this cross-sectional study, data from three waves of survey data collection (2007, 2009 and 2011) were combined resulting in a sample of 3381 adults. Self-reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI. Depressive symptoms were assessed with Brief Symptoms Inventory items. Socio-demographic factors included age, race/ethnicity, gender and education.

RESULTS:

Using stepwise linear regression, gender (β = 0.04, P = 0.02) and the interaction terms of race/ethnicity × depressive symptoms (β = 0.15, P < 0.001) and gender × depressive symptoms (β = 0.05, P = 0.01) uniquely predicted BMI.

CONCLUSION:

Women had a higher BMI than men, and depressive symptoms were more strongly associated with BMI among African Americans and women than among non-Latino Whites and men. Tailored interventions to alleviate depressive symptoms in African Americans and females may help decrease racial/ethnic and gender differences in depressive symptoms and obesity.

KEYWORDS:

adults; mental health; obesity

PMID:
25174039
DOI:
10.1093/pubmed/fdu062
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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