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Int J Mol Sci. 2018 Sep 20;19(10). pii: E2855. doi: 10.3390/ijms19102855.

The Effects of High Fat Diet-Induced Stress on Olfactory Sensitivity, Behaviors, and Transcriptional Profiling in Drosophila melanogaster.

Author information

1
Department of Life Sciences and Convergence Research Center for Insect Vectors, Incheon National University, 119 Academy-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 22012, Korea. jjewony@gmail.com.
2
Department of Life Sciences and Convergence Research Center for Insect Vectors, Incheon National University, 119 Academy-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 22012, Korea. kdin34@naver.com.
3
Department of Life Sciences and Convergence Research Center for Insect Vectors, Incheon National University, 119 Academy-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 22012, Korea. bkdgy93@gmail.com.
4
Department of Life Sciences and Convergence Research Center for Insect Vectors, Incheon National University, 119 Academy-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 22012, Korea. hwkwon@inu.ac.kr.

Abstract

High-fat diet (HFD) often causes obesity and it has detrimental effects on the sensory system. In particular, sensory-mediated responses are crucial for maintaining energy balance, as they are involved in a metabolic regulation; however, there is still no clear explanation about the relationship between HFD-induced stress and sensory system. To gain insight on how HFD-induced stress affects olfactory sensitivity and behavioral responses, we have used a Drosophila melanogaster model for olfactory and nutrient-related signaling and accessed physiological, behavioral, and transcriptional changes. We demonstrated that lifespan and climbing ability in HFD-treated flies decreased and that olfactory sensitivity and behavioral responses to odorants were changed. Olfactory sensitivity to eight of ten odorants after 14 days on HFD treatment were reduced, while behavioral attraction was increased to benzaldehyde in flies that were treated with HFD. This behavioral and physiological modification in HFD-treated flies for 14 days was accompanied by a significant decrease in DmOrco gene expression in a peripheral olfactory organ, suggesting that is could be involved in the action of metabolic and sensory signal. Gene expression profiles of antennae showed significant differences on the olfactory receptors, odorant-binding proteins, and insulin signaling. Our results suggested that olfactory sensitivity and behavioral responses to HFD-induced stress are mediated through olfactory and nutrient-related signaling pathways.

KEYWORDS:

Drosophila melanogaster; climbing behaviors; gene expression; high fat diet; olfaction; olfactory receptors

PMID:
30241362
PMCID:
PMC6213603
DOI:
10.3390/ijms19102855
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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