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Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jul 18;14(7):12828-46. doi: 10.3390/s140712828.

Introduction and testing of a monitoring and colony-mapping method for waterbird populations that uses high-speed and ultra-detailed aerial remote sensing.

Author information

1
Interspect Research Group, Rákóczi Ferenc út 42, 2314 Halásztelek II, Hungary. bakogabor@interspect.hu.
2
Interspect Research Group, Rákóczi Ferenc út 42, 2314 Halásztelek II, Hungary. tolnaimarton@interspect.hu.
3
Interspect Research Group, Rákóczi Ferenc út 42, 2314 Halásztelek II, Hungary. takacsadam@interspect.hu.

Abstract

Remote sensing is a method that collects data of the Earth's surface without causing disturbances. Thus, it is worthwhile to use remote sensing methods to survey endangered ecosystems, as the studied species will behave naturally while undisturbed. The latest passive optical remote sensing solutions permit surveys from long distances. State-of-the-art highly sensitive sensor systems allow high spatial resolution image acquisition at high altitudes and at high flying speeds, even in low-visibility conditions. As the aerial imagery captured by an airplane covers the entire study area, all the animals present in that area can be recorded. A population assessment is conducted by visual interpretations of an ortho image map. The basic objective of this study is to determine whether small- and medium-sized bird species are recognizable in the ortho images by using high spatial resolution aerial cameras. The spatial resolution needed for identifying the bird species in the ortho image map was studied. The survey was adjusted to determine the number of birds in a colony at a given time.

PMID:
25046012
PMCID:
PMC4168513
DOI:
10.3390/s140712828
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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