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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Oct 20;14(10). pii: E1265. doi: 10.3390/ijerph14101265.

Wear and Tear of Tyres: A Stealthy Source of Microplastics in the Environment.

Author information

1
Department of Science, Faculty of Management, Science & Technology, Open University of The Netherlands, 6419 AT Heerlen, The Netherlands. PJ.Kole@studie.ou.nl.
2
Department of Science, Faculty of Management, Science & Technology, Open University of The Netherlands, 6419 AT Heerlen, The Netherlands. Ansje.Lohr@ou.nl.
3
Department of Science, Faculty of Management, Science & Technology, Open University of The Netherlands, 6419 AT Heerlen, The Netherlands. Frank.vanBelleghem@ou.nl.
4
Zoology: Biodiversity and Toxicology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, BE 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium. Frank.vanBelleghem@ou.nl.
5
Department of Science, Faculty of Management, Science & Technology, Open University of The Netherlands, 6419 AT Heerlen, The Netherlands. Ad.Ragas@ou.nl.
6
Institute of Water and Wetland Research, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 AJ Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Ad.Ragas@ou.nl.

Abstract

Wear and tear from tyres significantly contributes to the flow of (micro-)plastics into the environment. This paper compiles the fragmented knowledge on tyre wear and tear characteristics, amounts of particles emitted, pathways in the environment, and the possible effects on humans. The estimated per capita emission ranges from 0.23 to 4.7 kg/year, with a global average of 0.81 kg/year. The emissions from car tyres (100%) are substantially higher than those of other sources of microplastics, e.g., airplane tyres (2%), artificial turf (12-50%), brake wear (8%) and road markings (5%). Emissions and pathways depend on local factors like road type or sewage systems. The relative contribution of tyre wear and tear to the total global amount of plastics ending up in our oceans is estimated to be 5-10%. In air, 3-7% of the particulate matter (PM2.5) is estimated to consist of tyre wear and tear, indicating that it may contribute to the global health burden of air pollution which has been projected by the World Health Organization (WHO) at 3 million deaths in 2012. The wear and tear also enters our food chain, but further research is needed to assess human health risks. It is concluded here that tyre wear and tear is a stealthy source of microplastics in our environment, which can only be addressed effectively if awareness increases, knowledge gaps on quantities and effects are being closed, and creative technical solutions are being sought. This requires a global effort from all stakeholders; consumers, regulators, industry and researchers alike.

KEYWORDS:

microplastics; particulate matter; tyre rubber; tyre wear and tear

PMID:
29053641
PMCID:
PMC5664766
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph14101265
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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