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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Jul 19;15(7). pii: E1531. doi: 10.3390/ijerph15071531.

Mapping the Urban Lead Exposome: A Detailed Analysis of Soil Metal Concentrations at the Household Scale Using Citizen Science.

Author information

1
Department of Earth Sciences and Center for Urban Health, Indiana University⁻Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), 723 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. gfilippe@iupui.edu.
2
Environmental Resilience Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 46202, USA. gfilippe@iupui.edu.
3
Department of Earth Sciences and Center for Urban Health, Indiana University⁻Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), 723 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. jess.adamic@gmail.com.
4
Department of Earth Sciences and Center for Urban Health, Indiana University⁻Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), 723 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. deemorri@iupui.edu.
5
Department of Earth Sciences and Center for Urban Health, Indiana University⁻Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), 723 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. jshukle@iu.edu.
6
Department of Earth Sciences and Center for Urban Health, Indiana University⁻Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), 723 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. efrix@indiana.edu.

Abstract

An ambitious citizen science effort in the city of Indianapolis (IN, USA) led to the collection and analysis of a large number of samples at the property scale, facilitating the analysis of differences in soil metal concentrations as a function of property location (i.e., dripline, yard, and street) and location within the city. This effort indicated that dripline soils had substantially higher values of lead and zinc than other soil locations on a given property, and this pattern was heightened in properties nearer the urban core. Soil lead values typically exceeded the levels deemed safe for children's play areas in the United States (<400 ppm), and almost always exceeded safe gardening guidelines (<200 ppm). As a whole, this study identified locations within properties and cities that exhibited the highest exposure risk to children, and also exhibited the power of citizen science to produce data at a spatial scale (i.e., within a property boundary), which is usually impossible to feasibly collect in a typical research study.

KEYWORDS:

citizen-science; exposome; lead poisoning; urban metals

PMID:
30029546
PMCID:
PMC6069257
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph15071531
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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