Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Materials (Basel). 2018 May 18;11(5). pii: E838. doi: 10.3390/ma11050838.

2.45 GHz Microwave Processing and Its Influence on Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastics.

Author information

1
Technical University of Munich, Chair of Carbon Composites, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching, Germany. daniel.teufl@tum.de.
2
Technical University of Munich, Chair of Carbon Composites, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching, Germany. info@lcc.mw.tum.de.

Abstract

During the production of fiber-reinforced composite materials, liquid resin is introduced into the fiber material and cured, i.e., hardened. An elevated temperature is needed for this curing. Microwave curing of composites has been investigated for some time, but it has mostly been done using small domestic or laboratory equipment. However, no investigation has been carried out using an industrial-sized chamber-microwave for glass fiber-reinforced plastic (GFRP). Here, we show that microwave curing produces laminates of the same quality as oven-cured ones. The study shows that, if the process is done right, GFRP samples can be produced with an industrial scale microwave. Even if not fully cured, microwave samples show a glass transition temperature measured with DMA (Tg-DMA) that is comparable to the Tg-DMA according to the proposed cure cycle on the data sheet. Specific microwave-cured configurations show better inter-laminar shear strength than oven specimens. The results show that microwave-based heat introduction can be a beneficial curing method for GFRP laminates. A microwave-optimized process is faster and leads to better mechanical properties.

KEYWORDS:

2.45 GHz; DIN EN 14130; GFRP; composites; curing; epoxy; glass; hephaistos; mechanical properties; microwave

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center