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Medicina (Kaunas). 2014;50(3):162-8. doi: 10.1016/j.medici.2014.07.001. Epub 2014 Jul 28.

Self-reported cannabis products and other illicit drugs consumption in older school-age children in Northern Lithuania: a comparison between 2006 and 2012.

Author information

1
Šiauliai University, Šiauliai, Lithuania. Electronic address: d.miniauskiene@gmail.com.
2
Faculty of Health Sciences, Klaipėda University, Klaipėda, Lithuania.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Cannabis use is widespread among young people in Europe. The aim of this study was to analyze and to compare the associations between the self-reported consumption of cannabis products and other illicit drugs among older schoolchildren in 2006 and in 2012.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted in 2006 and 2012 in Northern Lithuania. In total 3447 young people aged 17-19 years were investigated (1585 male and 1862 female). For this survey, the ESPAD questionnaire was used.

RESULTS:

In Northern Lithuania, the schoolchildren aged 17-19 years self-reported that 16.7% in 2006 and 23.9% in 2012 of them tried cannabis products. The consumption of cannabis products in the age group of 17 years increased from 14.9% in 2006 to 21.5% in 2012. The consumption of cannabis together with alcohol increased from 7.6% to 14.3%. Cannabis consumers more often tried amphetamines, heroin, LSD, cocaine, crack, ecstasy, hallucinogenic mushrooms, and injective drugs. In 2012, cannabis consumers girls less than boys used only crack and injective drugs; all other illicit drugs they used the same often as boys.

CONCLUSIONS:

The cannabis products consumption in schoolchildren has increased by 7%. Nearly twofold increase was observed in the consumption of cannabis together with alcohol. Young people who used cannabis products more often tried other illicit drugs. There were no differences by gender in the consumption of illicit drugs among cannabis consumers.

KEYWORDS:

Cannabis products; Drug consumption; Illicit drugs; Older school-age children

PMID:
25323544
DOI:
10.1016/j.medici.2014.07.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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