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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 May 8;16(9). pii: E1606. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16091606.

Climate Change and Consumer's Attitude toward Insect Food.

Author information

1
Department of Health Diet and Industry Management, Chung Shan Medical University, No. 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., Taichung City 40201, Taiwan. pamela22@csmu.edu.tw.
2
Department of Medical Management, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, No. 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., Taichung City 40201, Taiwan. pamela22@csmu.edu.tw.
3
Department of Public Administration and Management, National University of Tainan, Taiwan No. 33, Sec. 2, Shu-Lin St., Tainan 70005, Taiwan. ccma@mail.nutn.edu.tw.
4
Department of Health Diet and Industry Management, Chung Shan Medical University, No. 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., Taichung City 40201, Taiwan. allen975@csmu.edu.tw.
5
Department of Medical Management, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, No. 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., Taichung City 40201, Taiwan. allen975@csmu.edu.tw.

Abstract

Given the influence of rising environmental awareness, food systems and security are receiving increasing international attention. Previous studies have discussed the acceptance of insect foods but have been primarily conducted in a European context. Hence, their results cannot be applied to Taiwanese consumers. Regarding this, our study is centered on the theory of planned behavior and considers environmental concern and food neophobia to discuss the effects of consumer attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control on the purchase intention toward insect food. We used purposive sampling to survey questionnaire answers face-to-face in Taichung city, Taiwan. We distributed 408 surveys of which 77.45% were used in this study. The results revealed that consumer attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and food neophobia significantly influence purchase intention, whereas subjective norms and environmental concern did not demonstrate significant relationships with purchase intention. According to these results, we suggest that businesses emphasize consumers' product experience or reduce levels of food neophobia to increase consumer interest in insect foods and improve the acceptability of such foods, thereby increasing purchase intention.

KEYWORDS:

behavior change; environmental concern; food neophobia; global environmental change; vulnerability of food systems

PMID:
31071928
PMCID:
PMC6539282
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph16091606
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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