Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Toxics. 2018 Aug 7;6(3). pii: E46. doi: 10.3390/toxics6030046.

Aldehydes in Exhaled Breath during E-Cigarette Vaping: Pilot Study Results.

Author information

1
Organic Analytical Laboratory, Desert Research Institute (DRI), Reno, NV 89512, USA. vera.samburova@dri.edu.
2
Organic Analytical Laboratory, Desert Research Institute (DRI), Reno, NV 89512, USA. Chiranjivi.Bhattarai@dri.edu.
3
School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA. mstrickland@unr.edu.
4
School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA. ldarrow@unr.edu.
5
School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA. jeffa@unr.edu.
6
Organic Analytical Laboratory, Desert Research Institute (DRI), Reno, NV 89512, USA. Yeongkwon.Son@dri.edu.
7
Organic Analytical Laboratory, Desert Research Institute (DRI), Reno, NV 89512, USA. Andrey.Khlystov@dri.edu.

Abstract

Several studies have shown the presence of aldehydes (i.e., formaldehyde, acrolein) in mainstream emissions of some e-cigarettes. For this reason, concerns have been raised regarding potential toxicity. The purpose of this research was to measure levels of carbonyls in exhaled breath of e-cigarette users during "vaping" sessions and estimate the respiratory tract (RT) uptake of specific aldehydes, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. We measured concentrations of 12 carbonyls in e-cigarette aerosols produced directly by e-cigarettes and in the exhaled breath of 12 participants (19 sessions). Carbonyls were sampled on 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) cartridges and analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with a UV/Vis photodiode detector. We found that in most cases, levels of aldehydes and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) were significantly higher (2⁻125 times) in exhaled e-cigarette breaths than in pre-exposed breath. Exposure levels for the most abundant individual carbonyls in e-cigarette emissions-formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein-were between the limit of quantification (LOQ) and 24.4 μg·puff-1. The mean retention of formaldehyde in the respiratory tract was 99.7 ± 0.9% for all participants, while acetaldehyde retention was 91.6 ± 9.9%. Within the limitation of a small number of participants, our results showed that there is an increase in breath carbonyls during e-cigarette use.

KEYWORDS:

aldehydes; breath analysis; e-cigarette emissions; exposure; respiratory tract retention

PMID:
30087275
DOI:
10.3390/toxics6030046
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
Loading ...
Support Center