Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Brain Sci. 2019 Mar 28;9(4). pii: E74. doi: 10.3390/brainsci9040074.

Localization of Free and Bound Metal Species through X-Ray Synchrotron Fluorescence Microscopy in the Rodent Brain and Their Relation to Behavior.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA. caroline.neely@nih.gov.
2
Department of Psychology & Sociology, Angelo State University, 2601 W. Avenue N, ASU Station #10907, San Angelo, TX 76909, USA. stephen.lippi@angelo.edu.
3
Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, University of Chicago, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA. lanzirotti@uchicago.edu.
4
Department of Psychology, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA. jflinn@gmu.edu.

Abstract

Biometals in the brain, such as zinc, copper, and iron, are often discussed in cases of neurological disorders; however, these metals also have important regulatory functions and mediate cell signaling and plasticity. With the use of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence, our lab localized total, both bound and free, levels of zinc, copper, and iron in a cross section of one hemisphere of a rat brain, which also showed differing metal distributions in different regions within the hippocampus, the site in the brain known to be crucial for certain types of memory. This review discusses the several roles of these metals in brain regions with an emphasis on hippocampal cell signaling, based on spatial mapping obtained from X-ray fluorescence microscopy. We also discuss the localization of these metals and emphasize different cell types and receptors in regions with metal accumulation, as well as the potential relationship between this physiology and behavior.

KEYWORDS:

X-ray fluorescence; copper; iron; long-term potentiation; zinc

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center