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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 May 16;11(5):5333-48. doi: 10.3390/ijerph110505333.

Face validity of the single work ability item: comparison with objectively measured heart rate reserve over several days.

Author information

1
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. ngu@nrcwe.dk.
2
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. ksogaard@health.sdu.dk.
3
Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, 5230, Odense M, Denmark. ksogaard@health.sdu.dk.
4
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. igc@nrcwe.dk.
5
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. carolinestordal@gmail.com.
6
Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA) Nöldnerstr, 40-42, D-10317, Berlin, Germany. hanisch.christiana@baua.bund.de.
7
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. aho@nrcwe.dk.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the face validity of the self-reported single item work ability with objectively measured heart rate reserve (%HRR) among blue-collar workers.

METHODS:

We utilized data from 127 blue-collar workers (Female = 53; Male = 74) aged 18-65 years from the cross-sectional "New method for Objective Measurements of physical Activity in Daily living (NOMAD)" study. The workers reported their single item work ability and completed an aerobic capacity cycling test and objective measurements of heart rate reserve monitored with Actiheart for 3-4 days with a total of 5,810 h, including 2,640 working hours.

RESULTS:

A significant moderate correlation between work ability and %HRR was observed among males (R = -0.33, P = 0.005), but not among females (R = 0.11, P = 0.431). In a gender-stratified multi-adjusted logistic regression analysis, males with high %HRR were more likely to report a reduced work ability compared to males with low %HRR [OR = 4.75, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.31 to 17.25]. However, this association was not found among females (OR = 0.26, 95% CI 0.03 to 2.16), and a significant interaction between work ability, %HRR and gender was observed (P = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS:

The observed association between work ability and objectively measured %HRR over several days among male blue-collar workers supports the face validity of the single work ability item. It is a useful and valid measure of the relation between physical work demands and resources among male blue-collar workers. The contrasting association among females needs to be further investigated.

PMID:
24840350
PMCID:
PMC4053900
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph110505333
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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