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Items: 1 to 20 of 25

1.

Cytotoxic and antibacterial effect of a red propolis mouthwash, with or without fluoride, on the growth of a cariogenic biofilm.

Martins ML, Monteiro ASN, Guimarães JEC, Guimarães MBCT, da Silva RF, Cabral LM, Farah A, dePaula J, Romanos MTV, Maia LC, Cavalcanti YW, Fonseca-Gonçalves A.

Arch Oral Biol. 2019 Jul 30;107:104512. doi: 10.1016/j.archoralbio.2019.104512. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
31382160
2.

Homeopathic medicine of Melissa officinalis combined or not with Phytolacca decandra in the treatment of possible sleep bruxism in children: A crossover randomized triple-blinded controlled clinical trial.

Tavares-Silva C, Holandino C, Homsani F, Luiz RR, Prodestino J, Farah A, Lima JP, Simas RC, Castilho CVV, Leitão SG, Maia LC, Fonseca-Gonçalves A.

Phytomedicine. 2019 May;58:152869. doi: 10.1016/j.phymed.2019.152869. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

PMID:
30831467
3.

Treatment of dental biofilm with a tincture of Bauhinia forficata leaves: an ex-vivo study.

Ferreira-Filho JCC, Marre ATO, Almeida JSS, Lobo LA, Farah A, Valença AMG, Fonseca-Gonçalves A.

Nat Prod Res. 2018 May 21:1-4. doi: 10.1080/14786419.2018.1477146. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29781298
4.

Comparative oesophageal cancer risk assessment of hot beverage consumption (coffee, mate and tea): the margin of exposure of PAH vs very hot temperatures.

Okaru AO, Rullmann A, Farah A, Gonzalez de Mejia E, Stern MC, Lachenmeier DW.

BMC Cancer. 2018 Mar 1;18(1):236. doi: 10.1186/s12885-018-4060-z.

5.

Are Pediatric Antibiotic Formulations Potentials Risk Factors for Dental Caries and Dental Erosion?

Valinoti AC, da Costa LC Jr, Farah A, Pereira de Sousa V, Fonseca-Gonçalves A, Maia LC.

Open Dent J. 2016 Aug 22;10:420-30. doi: 10.2174/1874210601610010420. eCollection 2016.

6.

Coffee, maté, açaí and beans are the main contributors to the antioxidant capacity of Brazilian's diet.

Torres T, Farah A.

Eur J Nutr. 2017 Jun;56(4):1523-1533. doi: 10.1007/s00394-016-1198-9. Epub 2016 Mar 14.

PMID:
26972079
7.

Distribution of Major Chlorogenic Acids and Related Compounds in Brazilian Green and Toasted Ilex paraguariensis (Maté) Leaves.

Lima Jde P, Farah A, King B, de Paulis T, Martin PR.

J Agric Food Chem. 2016 Mar 23;64(11):2361-70. doi: 10.1021/acs.jafc.6b00276. Epub 2016 Mar 11.

PMID:
26924157
8.

Influence of a Brazilian wild green propolis on the enamel mineral loss and Streptococcus mutans' count in dental biofilm.

Cardoso JG, Iorio NL, Rodrigues LF, Couri ML, Farah A, Maia LC, Antonio AG.

Arch Oral Biol. 2016 May;65:77-81. doi: 10.1016/j.archoralbio.2016.02.001. Epub 2016 Feb 3.

PMID:
26871983
9.

Using Real-Time PCR as a tool for monitoring the authenticity of commercial coffees.

Ferreira T, Farah A, Oliveira TC, Lima IS, Vitório F, Oliveira EM.

Food Chem. 2016 May 15;199:433-8. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.12.045. Epub 2015 Dec 10.

PMID:
26775992
10.

Coffee Adulteration: More than Two Decades of Research.

Toci AT, Farah A, Pezza HR, Pezza L.

Crit Rev Anal Chem. 2016;46(2):83-92. doi: 10.1080/10408347.2014.966185. Review.

PMID:
25633422
11.

Volatile fingerprint of Brazilian defective coffee seeds: corroboration of potential marker compounds and identification of new low quality indicators.

Toci AT, Farah A.

Food Chem. 2014 Jun 15;153:298-314. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.12.040. Epub 2013 Dec 14.

PMID:
24491734
12.

Effect of Coffea canephora aqueous extract on microbial counts in ex vivo oral biofilms: a case study.

Antonio AG, Iorio NL, Farah A, Netto dos Santos KR, Maia LC.

Planta Med. 2012 May;78(8):755-60. doi: 10.1055/s-0031-1298435. Epub 2012 Apr 24.

13.

Influence of coffee roasting on the incorporation of phenolic compounds into melanoidins and their relationship with antioxidant activity of the brew.

Perrone D, Farah A, Donangelo CM.

J Agric Food Chem. 2012 May 2;60(17):4265-75. doi: 10.1021/jf205388x. Epub 2012 Apr 19. Erratum in: J Agric Food Chem. 2012 Nov 14;60(45):11447.

PMID:
22490054
14.

Effect of simultaneous consumption of milk and coffee on chlorogenic acids' bioavailability in humans.

Duarte GS, Farah A.

J Agric Food Chem. 2011 Jul 27;59(14):7925-31. doi: 10.1021/jf201906p. Epub 2011 Jun 15. Erratum in: J Agric Food Chem. 2011 Oct 12;59(19):10772.

PMID:
21627318
15.

Modeling weight loss and chlorogenic acids content in coffee during roasting.

Perrone D, Donangelo R, Donangelo CM, Farah A.

J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Dec 8;58(23):12238-43. doi: 10.1021/jf102110u. Epub 2010 Nov 4.

PMID:
21049932
16.
17.

Chlorogenic acids from green coffee extract are highly bioavailable in humans.

Farah A, Monteiro M, Donangelo CM, Lafay S.

J Nutr. 2008 Dec;138(12):2309-15. doi: 10.3945/jn.108.095554.

PMID:
19022950
18.

Fast simultaneous analysis of caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid and sucrose in coffee by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

Perrone D, Donangelo CM, Farah A.

Food Chem. 2008 Oct 15;110(4):1030-5. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2008.03.012. Epub 2008 Mar 18.

PMID:
26047298
19.

Volatile compounds as potential defective coffee beans' markers.

Toci AT, Farah A.

Food Chem. 2008 Jun 1;108(3):1133-41. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2007.11.064. Epub 2007 Dec 3.

PMID:
26065781
20.

Chlorogenic acid compounds from coffee are differentially absorbed and metabolized in humans.

Monteiro M, Farah A, Perrone D, Trugo LC, Donangelo C.

J Nutr. 2007 Oct;137(10):2196-201.

PMID:
17884997

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