Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nutrients. 2018 Aug 3;10(8). pii: E1017. doi: 10.3390/nu10081017.

Dietary and Physical Activity Behaviours in African Migrant Women Living in High Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Framework Synthesis.

Author information

1
Institute of Heath & Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, Tyne and Wear NE2 4AX, UK. l.n.ngongalah2@newcastle.ac.uk.
2
Institute of Heath & Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, Tyne and Wear NE2 4AX, UK. judith.rankin@newcastle.ac.uk.
3
Department of Social Work, Education and Community Wellbeing, Northumbria University, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, Tyne and Wear NE7 7XA, UK. A.O.Odeniyi2@newcastle.ac.uk.
4
Institute of Heath & Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, Tyne and Wear NE2 4AX, UK. z.akhter@newcastle.ac.uk.
5
Institute of Heath & Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, Tyne and Wear NE2 4AX, UK. tim.rapley@northumbria.ac.uk.
6
Institute of Heath & Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, Tyne and Wear NE2 4AX, UK. Nicola.heslehurst@newcastle.ac.uk.

Abstract

Dietary and physical activity behaviours during preconception and in pregnancy are important determinants of maternal and child health. This review synthesised the available evidence on dietary and physical activity behaviours in pregnant women and women of childbearing age women who have migrated from African countries to live in high income countries. Searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, Pubmed, CINAHL, Scopus, Proquest, Web of Science, and the Cochrane library. Searches were restricted to studies conducted in high income countries and published in English. Data extraction and quality assessment were carried out in duplicate. Findings were synthesised using a framework approach, which included both a priori and emergent themes. Fourteen studies were identified; ten quantitative and four qualitative. Four studies included pregnant women. Data on nutrient intakes included macro- and micro-nutrients; and were suggestive of inadequacies in iron, folate, and calcium; and excessive sodium intakes. Dietary patterns were bicultural, including both Westernised and African dietary practices. Findings on physical activity behaviours were conflicting. Dietary and physical activity behaviours were influenced by post-migration environments, culture, religion, and food or physical activity-related beliefs and perceptions. Further studies are required to understand the influence of sociodemographic and other migration-related factors on behaviour changes after migration.

KEYWORDS:

African; behaviours; child-bearing age; determinants; diet; maternal obesity; maternal overweight; migrant; physical activity; pregnancy

PMID:
30081522
PMCID:
PMC6115772
DOI:
10.3390/nu10081017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center